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Effectiveness of Employer-Provided Financial Information: Hiring to Retiring

Author

Listed:
  • Robert L. Clark
  • Melinda Sandler Morrill
  • Steven G. Allen

Abstract

Workers plan and save for retirement throughout their careers. Individuals must navigate complex financial instruments and understand public and employer-provided retirement plan characteristics. Beginning when a worker is first hired, most employers provide the option to contribute to retirement saving plans. As workers near retirement, they face many choices that have considerable consequences for their retirement income security. At these two important periods, employers can provide timely information assisting workers in making choices that optimize lifetime wellbeing. Our research, conducted in cooperation with several large employers, illustrates the importance of employer-provided education in increasing worker understanding of several retirement-related issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert L. Clark & Melinda Sandler Morrill & Steven G. Allen, 2012. "Effectiveness of Employer-Provided Financial Information: Hiring to Retiring," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 314-318, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:102:y:2012:i:3:p:314-18
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Brugiavini, Agar & Cavapozzi, Danilo & Padula, Mario & Pettinicchi, Yuri, 2015. "Financial education, literacy and investment attitudes," SAFE Working Paper Series 86, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    2. Annamaria Lusardi & Pierre-Carl Michaud & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2015. "Using a Life Cycle Model to Evaluate Financial Literacy Program Effectiveness," Cahiers de recherche 1505, Chaire de recherche Industrielle Alliance sur les enjeux économiques des changements démographiques.
    3. Andy Sharma, 2015. "Divorce/Separation in Later-Life: A Fixed Effects Analysis of Economic Well-Being by Gender," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 299-306, June.
    4. Bucciol, Alessandro & Veronesi, Marcella, 2014. "Teaching children to save: What is the best strategy for lifetime savings?," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 1-17.
    5. Robert Clark & Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2017. "Employee Financial Literacy And Retirement Plan Behavior: A Case Study," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 55(1), pages 248-259, January.
    6. J. Michael Collins & Carly Urban, 2016. "The Role Of Information On Retirement Planning: Evidence From A Field Study," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(4), pages 1860-1872, October.
    7. repec:eee:pacfin:v:43:y:2017:i:c:p:218-237 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Shen, Chung-Hua & Lin, Shih-Jie & Tang, De-Piao & Hsiao, Yu-Jen, 2016. "The relationship between financial disputes and financial literacy," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 46-65.
    9. repec:kap:jfamec:v:39:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10834-017-9544-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Duca, John V. & Kumar, Anil, 2014. "Financial literacy and mortgage equity withdrawals," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 62-75.
    11. Emanuele Bajo & Massimiliano Barbi & Sandro Sandri, 2015. "Financial Literacy, Households' Investment Behavior, and Risk Propensity," Journal of Financial Management, Markets and Institutions, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 157-174, June.

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