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The Australian Productivity Miracle: A Sceptical View

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  • John Quiggin

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  • John Quiggin, 2001. "The Australian Productivity Miracle: A Sceptical View," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 8(4), pages 333-348.
  • Handle: RePEc:acb:agenda:v:8:y:2001:i:4:p:333-348
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    File URL: http://press-files.anu.edu.au/downloads/press/p92031/pdf/8-4-A-4.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Quiggin & Richard Snape, 2000. "Discussion of 'Microeconomic Policies and Structural Change'," RBA Annual Conference Volume (Discontinued), in: David Gruen & Sona Shrestha (ed.),The Australian Economy in the 1990s, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    2. Green, Francis & McIntosh, Steven, 2001. "The intensification of work in Europe," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 291-308, May.
    3. John Quiggin, 1999. "Human Capital Theory and Education Policy in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 32(2), pages 130-144, June.
    4. John Quiggin, 1997. "Estimating the Benefits of Hilmer and Related Reforms," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 30(3), pages 256-272, September.
    5. Charles Bean, 2000. "The Australian Economic 'Miracle': A View from the North," RBA Annual Conference Volume (Discontinued), in: David Gruen & Sona Shrestha (ed.),The Australian Economy in the 1990s, Reserve Bank of Australia.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tom Valentine, 2004. "Real Wages and Unemployment: State of the Debate," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 11(4), pages 307-320.
    2. Productivity Commission, 2005. "Trends in Australian Agriculture," Research Papers 0502, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia.
    3. Roger Dean, 2002. "Economic and Social Benefits of Universities: Policy Implications," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 9(3), pages 275-288.
    4. Bibek Adhikari & Romain Duval & Bingjie Hu & Prakash Loungani, 2018. "Can Reform Waves Turn the Tide? Some Case Studies using the Synthetic Control Method," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 879-910, September.
    5. Ben Dolman, 2009. "What Happened to Australia's Productivity Surge?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(3), pages 243-263, September.
    6. Fred Argy, 2002. "National Competition Policy: Some Issues," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 9(1), pages 33-46.

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