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Explaining a dynamic CGE simulation with a trade-focused back-of-the-envelope analysis: the effects of eCommerce on Australia

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Listed:
  • Peter B. Dixon
  • Maureen T. Rimmer

Abstract

This paper was written in honour of Peter J. Lloyd on the occasion of his retirement and celebrates his preeminence as a theorist and practitioner of the economics of international trade. Besides a surprising number of leading trade theorists, Australia has added significantly to empirical work on trade issues via applied general equilibrium models, especially the ORANI and MONASH models. This paper focuses on one intriguing new topic, namely, the welfare and other economy-wide effects of the development of eCommerce. The direct effects of eCommerce are presented to the Monash model as shocks to 14 sets of technology, preference and trade variables. The shocks were suggested in group discussions with people knowledgeable in the operation of eCommerce and drawn from the sectors most likely to be affected by it. On the conservative assumptions made about the size of the shocks, eCommerce will after about 10 years allow a sustained increase in private and public real consumption of about 3 per cent. This and other results of the MONASH simulation are explained with the help of a relatively simple and small BOTE (back-of-the-envelope) model.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter B. Dixon & Maureen T. Rimmer, 2002. "Explaining a dynamic CGE simulation with a trade-focused back-of-the-envelope analysis: the effects of eCommerce on Australia," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-136, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
  • Handle: RePEc:cop:wpaper:g-136
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. John Quiggin, 1997. "Estimating the Benefits of Hilmer and Related Reforms," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 30(3), pages 256-272.
    2. Dunt, Emily S & Harper, Ian R, 2002. "E-Commerce and the Australian Economy," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(242), pages 327-342, September.
    3. Dixon, Peter B. & Parmenter, B.R., 1996. "Computable general equilibrium modelling for policy analysis and forecasting," Handbook of Computational Economics,in: H. M. Amman & D. A. Kendrick & J. Rust (ed.), Handbook of Computational Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 3-85 Elsevier.
    4. Peter B. Dixon & Maureen T. Rimmer, 1999. "Changes in Indirect Taxes in Australia: A Dynamic General Equilibrium Analysis," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 32(4), pages 327-348.
    5. Madden, Gary & Coble-Neal, Grant, 2002. "Internet Economics and Policy: An Australian Perspective," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 78(242), pages 343-357, September.
    6. Hertel, Thomas, 1997. "Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and applications," GTAP Books, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University, number 7685.
    7. Robert E. Litan & Alice M. Rivlin, 2001. "Projecting the Economic Impact of the Internet," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 313-317, May.
    8. Hans M. Amman & David A. Kendrick, . "Computational Economics," Online economics textbooks, SUNY-Oswego, Department of Economics, number comp1, March.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • L81 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Retail and Wholesale Trade; e-Commerce

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