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Changes in Indirect Taxes in Australia: A Dynamic General Equilibrium Analysis

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  • Peter B. Dixon
  • Maureen T. Rimmer

Abstract

Over the last thirty years, the effects of indirect taxation changes have been analysed using comparative static general equilibrium models. We use a new method to analyse current changes in Australia’s indirect taxes: dynamic computable general equilibrium modelling. Comparative static methods compare the situation in a given year (usually unspecified) with and without a policy change. The dynamic method shows the effects of a policy change through time. Comparative static methods are usually restricted to estimates of long‐run changes in allocative efficiency. The dynamic method provides information not only on efficiency but also on adjustment processes, including variations in employment. With our dynamic method, the effects of policy changes are analysed as deviations from explicit forecasts. We find that these forecasts are important for the policy results. For Australia’s current set of indirect tax changes, our main conclusions are (i) the short‐run employment effects depend critically on the wage response; (ii) merchandise exporters benefit but tourism is harmed; and (iii) the long‐run welfare effectsare likely to be negative, reflecting a decline in the terms of trade and increased compliance costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter B. Dixon & Maureen T. Rimmer, 1999. "Changes in Indirect Taxes in Australia: A Dynamic General Equilibrium Analysis," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 32(4), pages 327-348, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecr:v:32:y:1999:i:4:p:327-348
    DOI: 10.1111/1467-8462.00122
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8462.00122
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    Cited by:

    1. Stefan Boeters & Christoph Bohringer & Thiess Buttner & Margit Kraus, 2010. "Economic effects of VAT reforms in Germany," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(17), pages 2165-2182.
    2. John Freebairn, 2018. "Opportunities and Challenges for CGE Models in Analysing Taxation," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 37(1), pages 17-29, March.
    3. SIMIONESCU, Mihaela, 2015. "Modelling And Predicting The Indirect Taxes In Romania," Studii Financiare (Financial Studies), Centre of Financial and Monetary Research "Victor Slavescu", vol. 19(2), pages 67-77.
    4. Giesecke, James A. & Nhi, Tran Hoang, 2010. "Modelling value-added tax in the presence of multi-production and differentiated exemptions," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 156-173, April.
    5. Haddad, Eduardo & Domingues, Edson, 2002. "Tax policy and re-location," ERSA conference papers ersa02p074, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Jason Nassios & John Madden & James Giesecke & Janine Dixon & Nhi Tran & Peter Dixon & Maureen Rimmer & Philip Adams & John Freebairn, 2019. "The economic impact and efficiency of state and federal taxes in Australia," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-289, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
    7. James A. Giesecke & Nhi H. Tran, 2018. "The National and Regional Consequences of Australia's Goods and Services Tax," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 94(306), pages 255-275, September.
    8. Mariano, Marc Jim M. & Giesecke, James A., 2014. "The macroeconomic and food security implications of price interventions in the Philippine rice market," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 350-361.
    9. Peter B. Dixon & Maureen T. Rimmer, 2005. "Explaining a dynamic CGE simulation with a trade-focused back-of-the-envelope analysis: the effects of eCommerce on Australia," Chapters, in: Sisira Jayasuriya (ed.), Trade Theory, Analytical Models and Development, chapter 10, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Guilhoto, Joaquim José Martins & Hasegawa, Marcos & Lopes, Ricardo Luis, 2002. "A estrutura teórica do modelo inter-regional para a economia brasileira - MIBRA
      [The theoretical structure of inter regional model for the Brazilian economy - MIBRA]
      ," MPRA Paper 54019, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Dixon, Peter B. & Rimmer, Maureen T., 2013. "Validation in Computable General Equilibrium Modeling," Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, in: Peter B. Dixon & Dale Jorgenson (ed.), Handbook of Computable General Equilibrium Modeling, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 0, pages 1271-1330, Elsevier.
    12. James Giesecke, 2004. "The Extent and Consequences of Recent Structural Changes in the Australian Economy, 1997-2002: Results from Historical/Decomposition Simulations with MONASH," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-151, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.

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