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Fertility and the Real Exchange Rate

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  • Andrew K. Rose
  • Saktiandi Supaat

Abstract

We use a quinquennial data set covering 87 countries between 1975 and 2005 to investigate the relationship between fertility and the real effective exchange rate. Theoretically a country experiencing a decline in its fertility rate can be expected to have higher savings, lower investment, a current account surplus, and accordingly a real depreciation. We test and confirm this hypothesis, controlling for a host of potential determinants such as PPP deviations and the Balassa-Samuelson effect. We find a statistically significant and robust link between fertility and the exchange rate. Our point-estimate is that a decline in the fertility rate of one child per woman is associated with a depreciation of approximately .15% in the real effective exchange rate.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 13263.

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Date of creation: Jul 2007
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Publication status: published as Andrew K. Rose & Saktiandi Supaat & Jacob Braude, 2009. "Fertility and the real exchange rate," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 42(2), pages 496-518, May.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13263

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Cited by:
  1. Kamrul Hassan & Ruhul Salim, 2011. "The linkage between relative population growth and purchasing power parity: Cross country evidence," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 10(2), pages 154-169, July.
  2. Vincent BODART & Jean-François CARPANTIER, 2014. "Real Exchange Rates and Skills," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2014005, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  3. Max Groneck & Christoph Kaufmann, 2014. "Relative Sectoral Prices and Population Ageing: A Common Trend," Working Paper Series in Economics 69, University of Cologne, Department of Economics.
  4. Yin-Wong Cheung & Menzie D. Chinn & Eiji Fujii, 2008. "Pitfalls in Measuring Exchange Rate Misalignment: The Yuan and Other Currencies," NBER Working Papers 14168, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Yin-Wong Cheung & Menzie Chinn & Eiji Fujii, 2009. "Pitfalls in Measuring Exchange Rate Misalignment," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 183-206, April.

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