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The Effect of Female Education on Fertility and Infant Health: Evidence from School Entry Policies Using Exact Date of Birth

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  • Justin McCrary
  • Heather Royer

Abstract

This paper uses age-at-school-entry policies to identify the effect of female education on fertility and infant health. We focus on sharp contrasts in schooling, fertility, and infant health between women born just before and after the school entry date. School entry policies affect female education and the quality of a woman%u2019s mate and have generally small, but possibly heterogeneous, effects on fertility and infant health. We argue that school entry policies manipulate primarily the education of young women at risk of dropping out of school.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 12329.

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Date of creation: Jun 2006
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Publication status: published as McCrary, Justin, and Heather Royer. 2011. "The Effect of Female Education on Fertility and Infant Health: Evidence from School Entry Policies Using Exact Date of Birth." American Economic Review, 101(1): 158–95. DOI:10.1257/aer.101.1.158
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12329

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