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High school dropout and teen childbearing

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  • Marcotte, Dave E.

Abstract

Understanding the relationship between high school dropout and teen childbearing is complicated because both are affected by a variety of difficult to control factors. In this paper, I use panel data on aggregate dropout and fertility rates by age for all fifty states to develop insight by instrumenting for dropout using information on state policies on mandatory high school graduation exams. I then make use of these exit exam instruments in tandem with an instrument used previously in the literature to identify the impact of education on various outcomes: Compulsory schooling laws. Because these instruments operate at different margins, comparing effects provides insight into whether local average treatment effects are informative about average treatment effects relevant for a broader population than those complying with either instrument. The findings suggest that the elasticity of teen pregnancy with respect to high school dropout is 0.082 overall, with larger effects for black teens.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics of Education Review.

Volume (Year): 34 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 258-268

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:34:y:2013:i:c:p:258-268

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/econedurev

Related research

Keywords: High school dropout; High school exit exams; Teen pregnancy;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Grönqvist, Hans & Hall, Caroline, 2013. "Education policy and early fertility: Lessons from an expansion of upper secondary schooling," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 13-33.

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