Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The Impact of Education on Fertility and Child Mortality: Do Fathers Really Matter Less Than Mothers?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Lucia Breierova
  • Esther Duflo

Abstract

This paper takes advantage of a massive school construction program that took place in Indonesia between 1973 and 1978 to estimate the effect of education on fertility and child mortality. Time and region varying exposure to the school construction program generates instrumental variables for the average education in the household, and the difference in education between husband and wife. We show that female education is a stronger determinant of age at marriage and early fertility than male education. However, female and male education seem equally important factors in reducing child mortality. We suggest that the OLS estimate of the differential effect of women’s and men’s education may be biased by failure to take in to account assortative matching ... Ce document profite d’un programme massif de construction d’écoles mis en œuvre en Indonésie entre 1973 et 1978 pour déterminer les effets de l’éducation sur la fertilité et la mortalité infantile. L’impact changeant, dans le temps et dans les régions, de ce programme de construction d’écoles produit des variables instrumentales pour le niveau d’éducation moyen du ménage et pour les différences de niveau entre le mari et la femme. Les auteurs montrent que l’éducation des filles a davantage d’influence sur l’âge du mariage et du premier enfant que l’éducation des garçons. Cela étant, l’éducation des filles et des garçons semble avoir le même impact sur la réduction de la mortalité infantile. Les auteurs indiquent que l’estimation par les moindres carrés ordinaires de l’impact différentiel de l’éducation des femmes et des hommes pourrait bien être biaisée par l’incapacité à tenir compte de la constitution des couples par affinité sociale ...

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/325632465160
Our checks indicate that this address may not be valid because: 500 Internal Server Error (http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/325632465160 [303 See Other]--> http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/development/the-impact-of-education-on-fertility-and-child-mortality_325632465160). If this is indeed the case, please notify ()
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by OECD Publishing in its series OECD Development Centre Working Papers with number 217.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Nov 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:oec:devaaa:217-en

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 2 rue Andre Pascal, 75775 Paris Cedex 16
Phone: 33-(0)-1-45 24 82 00
Fax: 33-(0)-1-45 24 85 00
Email:
Web page: http://www.oecd.org/Dev
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Pitt, Mark M & Rosenzweig, Mark R & Gibbons, Donna M, 1993. "The Determinants and Consequences of the Placement of Government Programs in Indonesia," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 7(3), pages 319-48, September.
  2. Rosenzweig, Mark R. & Wolpin, Kenneth I., 1984. "Migration Selectivity and the Effects of Public Programs," Bulletins 8442, University of Minnesota, Economic Development Center.
  3. Heckman, J.J. & Hotz, V.J., 1988. "Choosing Among Alternative Nonexperimental Methods For Estimating The Impact Of Social Programs: The Case Of Manpower Training," University of Chicago - Economics Research Center 88-12, Chicago - Economics Research Center.
  4. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-in-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275, February.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Migration and Development: Who Bears the Burden of Proof? Justin Sandefur replies to Paul Collier
    by Duncan Green in From Poverty to Power on 2014-03-19 07:30:52
Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
This item has more than 25 citations. To prevent cluttering this page, these citations are listed on a separate page.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oec:devaaa:217-en. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.