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Computers as Pedagogical Tools in Brazil: A Pseudo-panel Analysis

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  • Sprietsma, Maresa

Abstract

In this paper, we use repeated cross-section data on pupils in Brazil to estimate the effect of the availability and use of computers and internet as pedagogical tools on math and reading test scores. Computers are increasingly commonly used in schools and their effectiveness in improving learning is the subject of many recent evaluations in Europe and the US. We apply the pseudo panel technique to evaluate the effect of variation in the availability and use of computers and internet in Brazilian schools on pupils? test scores.

Suggested Citation

  • Sprietsma, Maresa, 2007. "Computers as Pedagogical Tools in Brazil: A Pseudo-panel Analysis," ZEW Discussion Papers 07-040, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:5699
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen Machin & Sandra McNally & Olmo Silva, 2007. "New Technology in Schools: Is There a Payoff?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(522), pages 1145-1167, July.
    2. Deaton, Angus, 1985. "Panel data from time series of cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 109-126.
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    4. Austan Goolsbee & Jonathan Guryan, 2006. "The Impact of Internet Subsidies in Public Schools," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(2), pages 336-347, May.
    5. Grün, Carola, 2003. "Racial and Gender Wage Differentials in South Africa: What can Cohort Data tell?," Discussion Papers in Economics 85, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    6. Joshua Angrist & Victor Lavy, 2002. "New Evidence on Classroom Computers and Pupil Learning," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 735-765, October.
    7. Verbeek, Marno & Nijman, Theo, 1993. "Minimum MSE estimation of a regression model with fixed effects from a series of cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1-2), pages 125-136, September.
    8. repec:mpr:mprres:6181 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Shawn Cole & Esther Duflo & Leigh Linden, 2007. "Remedying Education: Evidence from Two Randomized Experiments in India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 1235-1264.
    10. Karl Taylor, 2002. "The impact of technology and trade upon the returns to education and occupation," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(11), pages 1371-1377.
    11. Propper, Carol, 2000. "The demand for private health care in the UK," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 855-876, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alderete, María Verónica & Formichella, María Marta, 2016. "The effect of ICTs on academic achievement: the Conectar Igualdad programme in Argentina," Revista CEPAL, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), August.
    2. Marie Hyland & Richard Layte & Seán Lyons & Selina McCoy & Mary Silles, 2015. "Are Classroom Internet Use and Academic Performance Higher after Government Broadband Subsidies to Primary Schools?," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 46(3), pages 399-428.
    3. repec:bla:devpol:v:35:y:2017:i:3:p:315-336 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Computers in schools; pupil performance;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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