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Improving the availability of trade finance during financial crises

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  • Auboin, Marc
  • Meier-Ewert, Moritz

Abstract

An analysis of the implications of recent financial crises affecting emerging economies in the 1990's points to the failure by private markets and other relevant institutions to meet the demand for cross-border and domestic short-term trade-finance in such periods, thereby affecting, in some countries and for certain periods, imports and exports to a point of stoppage. These experiences seem to suggest that there is scope for carefully targeted public intervention, as currently proposed by regional development banks and other actors, which have put in place ad-hoc schemes to maintain a minimum flow of trade finance during periods of scarcity, through systems of direct credit or credit guarantees. This paper explores the reasons behind the drying up of trade finance, both short and long-term, in particular as banks tend to concentrate on the more profitable and less risky segments of credit markets. It also describes ad-hoc schemes put in place by regional and multilateral institutions to keep minimal amounts of trade finance available at any time. It then goes on to examine a number of questions regarding the regulatory framework surrounding trade finance products, and looks at WTO rules in this regard. It also examines other areas where the WTO can play a role in facilitating and contributing to a global solution. In this context, a discussion of various proposals on the table is suggested.

Suggested Citation

  • Auboin, Marc & Meier-Ewert, Moritz, 2003. "Improving the availability of trade finance during financial crises," WTO Discussion Papers 2, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:wtodps:2
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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/107037/1/wto-discussion-paper_02.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lawrence H. Summers, 2000. "International Financial Crises: Causes, Prevention, and Cures," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 1-16, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Peter A.G. Van Bergeijk, 2009. "Expected Extent and Potential Duration of the World Import Crunch," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(4), pages 479-487, November.
    2. Pasadilla, Gloria O., 2010. "Financial Crisis, Trade Finance, and SMEs: Case of Central Asia," ADBI Working Papers 187, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    3. Auboin, Marc & Engemann, Martina, 2013. "Trade finance in periods of crisis: What have we learned in recent years?," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2013-01, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    4. Goldbach, Stefan & Nitsch, Volker, 2015. "Cutting the credit line: Evidence from Germany," Discussion Papers 25/2015, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    5. van Bergeijk, P.A.G., 2009. "Some economic historic perspectives on the 2009 world trade collapse," ISS Working Papers - General Series 476, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    6. Hwang, Sangyeon & Im, Hyejoon, 2013. "Financial shocks and trade finance: Evidence from Korea," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(1), pages 104-107.
    7. Peter A.G. van Bergeijk, 2010. "On the Brink of Deglobalization," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14122.
    8. Auboin, Marc & DiCaprio, Alisa, 2016. "Why do trade finance gaps persist: Does it matter for trade and development?," WTO Staff Working Papers ERSD-2017-01, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    9. Nitsch, Volker & Goldbach, Stefan, 2014. "Bank Credit and Trade: Evidence from Germany," VfS Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100534, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Segu Zuhair & Riccardo Natoli, 2012. "Issues with Debt Funding: Some Empirical Evidence Post-GFC," Acta Universitatis Bohemiae Meridionales, University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, vol. 15(2), pages 121-128.
    11. Robert Shelburne, 2010. "The Global Financial Crisis and Its Impact on Trade: The World and the European Emerging Economies," ECE Discussion Papers Series 2010_2, UNECE.
    12. Nick Freeman, 2015. "Financing Small and Medium Sized Enterprises for Sustainable Development: A View from the Asia-Pacific Region," MPDD Working Paper Series WP/15/05, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP).
    13. Independent Evaluation Group, 2013. "Evaluation of the International Finance Corporation's Global Trade Finance Program, 2006-12," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15769, July.
    14. Sailendra Narain, 2015. "Trade Finance for Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific," MPDD Working Paper Series WP/15/04, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP).

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