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Skill biased labour demand and the wage growth of younger workers: Evidence from an unexpected pension reform

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  • Danzer, Alexander

Abstract

Large-scale pension reforms can have redistributive wage effects across generations and education groups when the labour market suffers from skill mismatch. A quasi-experimental retirement shock in Ukraine illustrates the effect of labour scarcity on wage growth and returns to education: it reveals that young and well educated workers enjoyed significant wage growth accelerations while older workers with outdated skills did not benefit from the retirement of their comparable peers. The estimated wage effects are in line with predictions from a simple heterogeneous labour demand model applied to a cross-section of Ukrainian firms. The paper illustrates that general equilibrium wage effects can be estimated in a policy evaluation framework if quasi-experiments fulfil very restrictive preconditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Danzer, Alexander, 2015. "Skill biased labour demand and the wage growth of younger workers: Evidence from an unexpected pension reform," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113051, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc15:113051
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kupets, Olga, 2016. "Education-job mismatch in Ukraine: Too many people with tertiary education or too many jobs for low-skilled?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 125-147.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • P23 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Factor and Product Markets; Industry Studies; Population

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