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Kommerzieller Organhandel aus ökonomischer Sicht
[Commercial organ trade from an economic point of view]

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Listed:
  • Dilger, Alexander

Abstract

Organtransplantationen sind in Deutschland erlaubt und erwünscht, der Organhandel ist hingegen verboten. Das ist zumindest für Ökonomen begründungsbedürftig. Dazu werden verschiedene Arten von Organen getrennt analysiert. Wenn sich die Knappheit an transplantierbaren Organen durch finanzielle Anreize überwinden lässt, sollten diese zum Einsatz kommen. Wo dies nicht der Fall ist, können unerwünschte Verteilungswirkungen gegen kommerziellen Organhandel und für eine Zuteilung allein nach medizinischen Kriterien sprechen.

Suggested Citation

  • Dilger, Alexander, 2017. "Kommerzieller Organhandel aus ökonomischer Sicht
    [Commercial organ trade from an economic point of view]
    ," Discussion Papers of the Institute for Organisational Economics 11/2017, University of Münster, Institute for Organisational Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:umiodp:112017
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Abadie, Alberto & Gay, Sebastien, 2006. "The impact of presumed consent legislation on cadaveric organ donation: A cross-country study," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 599-620, July.
    2. Carl Mellström & Magnus Johannesson, 2008. "Crowding Out in Blood Donation: Was Titmuss Right?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 6(4), pages 845-863, June.
    3. Uri Gneezy & Aldo Rustichini, 2000. "Pay Enough or Don't Pay at All," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(3), pages 791-810.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • K38 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Human Rights Law; Gender Law

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