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Bildung, Innovationsdynamik und Produktivitätswachstum

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  • Stadler, Manfred

Abstract

Die Ergebnisse der kürzlich veröffentlichten PISA-Studie (OECD 2001) über den Bildungsstand der jüngeren Generation haben nicht nur zu einem Nachdenken über die Ursachen der für Deutschland sehr enttäuschenden Ergebnisse geführt, sondern auch die Diskussion über die Bedeutung von Bildung, Ausbildung und Qualifikation innerhalb und außerhalb der Profession neu belebt. Internationale empirische Querschnittsanalysen der letzten Jahre belegen den Zusammenhang zwischen der Qualifikation der Arbeitskräfte und dem Produktivitätswachstum in eindrucksvoller Weise. So haben etwa die ökonometrischen Studien von Hanushek/Kimko (2000) und Barro (2001) einen signifikant positiven Einfluss von Ausbildungszeiten und - qualitäten auf das Produktivitätswachstum nachgewiesen und damit die Diskussion über eine wachstumsfördernde Bildungspolitik auf eine solide empirische Grundlage gestellt (vgl. auch den Überblick in Krueger/Lindahl 2001).

Suggested Citation

  • Stadler, Manfred, 2004. "Bildung, Innovationsdynamik und Produktivitätswachstum," Tübinger Diskussionsbeiträge 280, University of Tübingen, School of Business and Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:tuedps:280
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    Cited by:

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    2. Felbermayr, Gabriel J. & Toubal, Farid, 2010. "Cultural proximity and trade," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 279-293, February.
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    4. Heger, Diana & Zaby, Alexandra K., 2009. "The propensity to patent with horizontally differentiated products: An empirical investigation," Tübinger Diskussionsbeiträge 324, University of Tübingen, School of Business and Economics.
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    6. Heger, Diana & Zaby, Alexandra K., 2009. "The propensity to patent with vertically differentiated products: An empirical investigation," Tübinger Diskussionsbeiträge 325, University of Tübingen, School of Business and Economics.
    7. Frontczak, Robert, 2009. "Valuing options in Heston's stochastic volatility model: Another analytical approach," Tübinger Diskussionsbeiträge 326, University of Tübingen, School of Business and Economics.
    8. Frontczak, Robert & Schöbel, Rainer, 2008. "Pricing American options with Mellin transforms," Tübinger Diskussionsbeiträge 319, University of Tübingen, School of Business and Economics.
    9. Dymke, Björn M. & Walter, Andreas, 2006. "Insider trading in Germany: Do corporate insiders exploit inside information?," Tübinger Diskussionsbeiträge 309, University of Tübingen, School of Business and Economics.
    10. Frontczak, Robert & Schöbel, Rainer, 2009. "On modified Mellin transforms, Gauss-Laguerre quadrature, and the valuation of American call options," Tübinger Diskussionsbeiträge 320, University of Tübingen, School of Business and Economics.
    11. Brandes, Julia & Schüle, Tobias, 2007. "IMF's assistance: Devil's kiss or guardian angel?," Tübinger Diskussionsbeiträge 310, University of Tübingen, School of Business and Economics.
    12. Maier, Ramona & Merz, Michael, 2008. "Credibility theory and filter theory in discrete and continuous time," Tübinger Diskussionsbeiträge 318, University of Tübingen, School of Business and Economics.

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