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Evaluating communication strategies for public agencies: transparency, opacity, and secrecy

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  • Lindner, Axel

Abstract

This paper analyses in a simple global games framework welfare effects stemming from different communication strategies of public agencies if strategies of agents are complementary to each other: communication can either be fully transparent, or the agency opaquely publishes only its overall assessment of the economy, or it keeps information completely secret. It is shown that private agents put more weight to their private information in the transparent case than in case of opacity. Thus, in many cases, the appropriate measure against overreliance on public information is giving more details to the public instead of denying access to public information.

Suggested Citation

  • Lindner, Axel, 2008. "Evaluating communication strategies for public agencies: transparency, opacity, and secrecy," IWH Discussion Papers 8/2008, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:iwhdps:iwh-8-08
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Crowe, Christopher & Meade, Ellen E., 2008. "Central bank independence and transparency: Evolution and effectiveness," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 763-777, December.
    2. repec:zbw:iwhdps:178 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Eijffinger, Sylvester C.W. & Geraats, Petra M., 2006. "How transparent are central banks?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 1-21, March.
    4. Pierre Gosselin & Aileen Lotz & Charles Wyplosz, 2009. "Interest Rate Signals and Central Bank Transparency," NBER Chapters,in: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2007, pages 9-51 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. repec:zbw:iwhdps:16-07 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Lindner, Axel, 2007. "Does too much Transparency of Central Banks Prevent Agents from Using their Private Information Efficiently?," IWH Discussion Papers 16/2007, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    7. Petra M. Geraats, 2006. "Transparency of Monetary Policy: Theory and Practice," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 52(1), pages 111-152, March.
    8. Lars E. O. Svensson, 2006. "Social Value of Public Information: Comment: Morris and Shin (2002) Is Actually Pro-Transparency, Not Con," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(1), pages 448-452, March.
    9. Axel Lindner, 2006. "Does Transparency of Central Banks Produce Multiple Equilibria on Currency Markets?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 108(1), pages 1-14, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    transparency; private information; common knowledge;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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