IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/ifwkie/4326.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Family background, schooling resources, and institutional features: What determines student performance in East Asian countries?

Author

Listed:
  • Gundlach, Erich
  • Wößmann, Ludger

Abstract

This paper examines determinants of educational performance in the high performing East Asian economies of Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, and Thailand by running within country regressions. The determinants considered include family background, school resources, and institutional characteristics of schools. Family background is found to be important, particularly in Korea. The class size appears to be positively associated with student performance, implying that putting in additional resources to reduce class size may not be an effective way to enhance the education sector?s productivity. al productivity. Such institutional characteristic of school as ?autonomy in teacher salary decision? is found strengthen student performance in Japan and Singapore. However, within country data provide limited variation in school institutional characteristics for the their effect to be precisely estimated. The results, despites their limitations, should be useful for future educational policy formulation not only in the East Asian countries examined but also in other developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Gundlach, Erich & Wößmann, Ludger, 2004. "Family background, schooling resources, and institutional features: What determines student performance in East Asian countries?," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 4326, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkie:4326
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/4326/1/Gu_Student_Performance.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lee, Jong-Wha & Barro, Robert J, 2001. "Schooling Quality in a Cross-Section of Countries," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 68(272), pages 465-488, November.
    2. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2000. "The Effects of Class Size on Student Achievement: New Evidence from Population Variation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1239-1285.
    3. Moulton, Brent R., 1986. "Random group effects and the precision of regression estimates," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 385-397, August.
    4. Alan B. Krueger, 2003. "Economic Considerations and Class Size," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages 34-63, February.
    5. Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2001. "Asymptotic Properties Of Weighted M-Estimators For Standard Stratified Samples," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(02), pages 451-470, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkie:4326. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iwkiede.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.