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On the bottom-up foundations of the banking-macro nexus

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  • Wäckerle, Manuel

Abstract

The complexity of credit money is seen as the central issue in the banking-macro nexus, which the author considers as a structural as well as a process component of the evolving economy. This nexus is significant for the stability/fragility of the economic system because it links the monetary domain with the real domain of economic production and consumption. The evolution of credit rules shapes economic networks between households, firms, banks, governments and central banks in space and time. The author discusses the properties and characteristics of this process in three sections. First, he discusses the origins of the theory of money and its role in contemporary monetary economics. Second, he briefly discusses current theoretical foundations of top-down and bottom-up approaches to the banking-macro nexus, such as DSGE or ABM. Third, he suggests an evolutionary framework, building on the generic-rule based approach, to arrive at standards for bottom-up foundations in agent-based models of the banking-macro nexus.

Suggested Citation

  • Wäckerle, Manuel, 2013. "On the bottom-up foundations of the banking-macro nexus," Economics Discussion Papers 2013-5, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwedp:20135
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    20th century origins of the theory of money; Schumpeterian credit-driven innovation; Post-Keynesian endogenous money; top-down versus bottom-up; evolutionary institutional approach to bank lending; generic credit rules as bottom-up foundations;

    JEL classification:

    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • B52 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary
    • B25 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought since 1925 - - - Historical; Institutional; Evolutionary; Austrian; Stockholm School
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • E51 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Money Supply; Credit; Money Multipliers

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