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Parental Gender Stereotypes and Student Wellbeing in China

Author

Listed:
  • Chu, Shuai
  • Zeng, Xiangquan
  • Zimmermann, Klaus F.

Abstract

Non-cognitive abilities are supposed to affect student's educational performance, who are challenged by parental expectations and norms. Parental gender stereotypes are shown to strongly decrease student wellbeing in China. Students are strongly more depressed, feeling blue, unhappy, not enjoying life and sad with no male-female differences while parental education does not matter.

Suggested Citation

  • Chu, Shuai & Zeng, Xiangquan & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2020. "Parental Gender Stereotypes and Student Wellbeing in China," GLO Discussion Paper Series 717, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:717
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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/226199/1/GLO-DP-0717.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michela Carlana, 2019. "Implicit Stereotypes: Evidence from Teachers’ Gender Bias," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 134(3), pages 1163-1224.
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    3. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2000. "Economics and Identity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(3), pages 715-753.
    4. Leonardo Bursztyn & Alessandra L. González & David Yanagizawa-Drott, 2020. "Misperceived Social Norms: Women Working Outside the Home in Saudi Arabia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 110(10), pages 2997-3029, October.
    5. Carol Graham, 2005. "The Economics of Happiness," World Economics, World Economics, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 6(3), pages 41-55, July.
    6. repec:hrv:faseco:33077826 is not listed on IDEAS
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender identity; gender stereotypes; student wellbeing; non-cognitive abilities; mental health; subjective wellbeing;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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