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Migration for Development: From Challenges to Opportunities

Author

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  • Zimmermann, Klaus F.

Abstract

This contribution investigates the opportunities of migration for developing countries. The benefits of migration for sending countries are often undervalued. But migrants may foster trade, remittances, innovations, investments back home, and even return home at some time with better human capital. Functioning diasporas can lead to stable factors of development. Policies in receiving developed countries towards migrants can enhance the positive impact of migration for development. Among those are measures to support the early integration of migrants into the educational systems and in the labor markets, including jobs for asylees. Dual citizenships and circular migration contracts are possible instruments. Migration policy can be an effective development policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2017. "Migration for Development: From Challenges to Opportunities," GLO Discussion Paper Series 70, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:70
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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/158004/1/GLO_DP_0070.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alpaslan Akay & Corrado Giulietti & Juan Robalino & Klaus Zimmermann, 2014. "Remittances and well-being among rural-to-urban migrants in China," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 517-546, September.
    2. repec:iza:izawol:journl:y:2014:p:82 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Amelie F. Constant & Olga Nottmeyer & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2013. "The economics of circular migration," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 3, pages 55-74 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Bauer, Thomas K. & Lofstrom, Magnus & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2000. "Immigration Policy, Assimilation of Immigrants and Natives' Sentiments towards Immigrants: Evidence from 12 OECD-Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 187, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Dean Yang, 2011. "Migrant Remittances," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 129-152, Summer.
    6. David Neumark, 2013. "Ethnic hiring," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 10, pages 193-213 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Nikolova, Milena & Roman, Monica & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2017. "Left behind but doing good? Civic engagement in two post-socialist countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 658-684.
    8. Annabelle Krause & Ulf Rinne & Klaus Zimmermann, 2012. "Anonymous job applications in Europe," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-20, December.
    9. Sides, John & Citrin, Jack, 2007. "European Opinion About Immigration: The Role of Identities, Interests and Information," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 37(03), pages 477-504, July.
    10. Akay, Alpaslan & Bargain, Olivier B. & Giulietti, Corrado & Robalino, Juan D. & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2016. "Remittances and relative concerns in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 191-207.
    11. Dean Yang, 2006. "Why Do Migrants Return to Poor Countries? Evidence from Philippine Migrants' Responses to Exchange Rate Shocks," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(4), pages 715-735, November.
    12. Sonia Plaza, 2013. "Diaspora resources and policies," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 27, pages 505-529 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    13. Constant, Amelie F. & Gataullina, Liliya & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2009. "Ethnosizing immigrants," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 69(3), pages 274-287, March.
    14. Amelie F. Constant, 2014. "Do migrants take the jobs of native workers?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-10, May.
    15. Kugler, Maurice & Rapoport, Hillel, 2007. "International labor and capital flows: Complements or substitutes?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 155-162, February.
    16. Murat Genç, 2014. "The impact of migration on trade," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-82, June.
    17. repec:iza:izawol:journl:y:2014:p:10 is not listed on IDEAS
    18. Klaus F. Zimmermann, 1996. "European Migration: Push and Pull," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 19(1-2), pages 95-128, April.
    19. Dean Yang, 2006. "Why Do Migrants Return to Poor Countries? Evidence From Philippine Migrants%u2019 Responses to Exchange Rate Shocks," NBER Working Papers 12396, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Don J. DeVoretz, 2013. "The economics of immigrant citizenship ascension," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 25, pages 470-488 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    21. Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2014. "Circular migration," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-1, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Remittances; circular migration; social remittances; diaspora economics; development; refugees; forced migration; dual citizenships; jobs for development; brain drain; brain gain;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances
    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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