IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/glodps/46.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Challenged by Migration: Europe’s Options

Author

Listed:
  • Constant, Amelie F.
  • Zimmermann, Klaus F.

Abstract

This paper examines the migration and labor mobility in the European Union and elaborates on their importance for the existence of the EU. Against all measures of success, the current public debate seems to suggest that the political consensus that migration is beneficial is broken. This comes with a crisis of European institutions in general. Migration and labor mobility have not been at the origin of the perceived cultural shift. The EU in its current form and ambition could perfectly survive or collapse even if it solves its migration challenge. But it will most likely collapse, if it fails to solve the mobility issue by not preserving free internal labor mobility and not establishing a joint external migration policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Constant, Amelie F. & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2017. "Challenged by Migration: Europe’s Options," GLO Discussion Paper Series 46, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:46
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/156404/1/GLO_DP_0046.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Constant, Amelie & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2005. "Immigrant Performance and Selective Immigration Policy: A European Perspective," National Institute Economic Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 194, pages 94-105, October.
    2. Corrado Giulietti, 2014. "The welfare magnet hypothesis and the welfare take-up of migrants," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-37, June.
    3. Alfonso Arpaia & Aron Kiss & Balazs Palvolgyi & Alessandro Turrini, 2016. "Labour mobility and labour market adjustment in the EU," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-21, December.
    4. Michel Beine & Pauline Bourgeon & Jean‐Charles Bricongne, 2019. "Aggregate Fluctuations and International Migration," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 121(1), pages 117-152, January.
    5. Amelie F. Constant & Klaus F. Zimmermann (ed.), 2013. "International Handbook on the Economics of Migration," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 4026.
    6. Martin Kahanec & Klaus F. Zimmermann (ed.), 2016. "Labor Migration, EU Enlargement, and the Great Recession," Springer Books, Springer, number 978-3-662-45320-9, August.
    7. Amelie F. Constant, 2014. "Do migrants take the jobs of native workers?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-10, May.
    8. repec:iza:izawol:journl:y:2014:p:10 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:iza:izawol:journl:y:2014:p:37 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Challenged by Migration: Europe’s Options
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2017-06-02 17:24:10
    2. Challenged by migration: Europe’s options
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2018-04-09 18:41:10

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Kahanec, Martin & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2016. "Post-Enlargement Migration and the Great Recession in the E(M)U: Lessons and policy implications," MERIT Working Papers 2016-066, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Julia Jauer & Thomas Liebig & John P. Martin & Patrick A. Puhani, 2019. "Migration as an adjustment mechanism in the crisis? A comparison of Europe and the United States 2006–2016," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 32(1), pages 1-22, January.
    3. Amelie F. Constant, 2019. "Return, Circular, and Onward Migration Decisions in a Knowledge Society," CESifo Working Paper Series 7913, CESifo.
    4. Artjoms Ivlevs & Michail Veliziotis, 2018. "Local-level immigration and life satisfaction: The EU enlargement experience in England and Wales," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 50(1), pages 175-193, February.
    5. Vernon, Victoria & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2019. "Walls and Fences: A Journey Through History and Economics," GLO Discussion Paper Series 330, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    6. Tausch, Arno, 2015. "Europe’s Refugee Crisis. Zur aktuellen politischen Ökonomie von Migration, Asyl und Integration in Europa [Europe's Refugee Crisis. On the current political economy of migration, asylum and integra," MPRA Paper 67400, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2017. "Migration for Development: From Challenges to Opportunities," GLO Discussion Paper Series 70, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    8. Florence Huart & Médédé Tchakpalla, 2019. "Labor Market Conditions and Geographic Mobility in the Eurozone," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 61(2), pages 263-284, June.
    9. Martin Kahanec & Martin Guzi, 2017. "How immigrants helped EU labor markets to adjust during the Great Recession," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(7), pages 996-1015, October.
    10. Milena Nikolova, 2015. "Migrant well-being after leaving transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 195-195, October.
    11. Martin Kahanec & Mariola Pytliková, 2017. "The economic impact of east–west migration on the European Union," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 44(3), pages 407-434, August.
    12. Martin Guzi & Štěpán Mikula, 2022. "Reforms that keep you at home: The effects of economic transition on migration," Economics of Transition and Institutional Change, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 30(2), pages 289-310, April.
    13. Joel OUDINET, 2021. "Introduction - L’impact de la migration sur le développement inclusif," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 53, pages 5-21.
    14. Bernt Bratsberg & Oddbjørn Raaum & Knut Røed, 2021. "Excess churn in integrated labor markets," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 34(3), pages 865-892, July.
    15. Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2018. "Social Cohesion and Labor Mobility," GLO Discussion Paper Series 249, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    16. Ekaterina Sprenger, 2021. "What makes us move, what makes us stay: The role of culture in intra-EU mobility," SERIES 04-2021, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza - Università degli Studi di Bari "Aldo Moro", revised Oct 2021.
    17. Zaiceva, A. & Zimmermann, K.F., 2016. "Migration and the Demographic Shift," Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, in: Piggott, John & Woodland, Alan (ed.), Handbook of the Economics of Population Aging, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 0, pages 119-177, Elsevier.
    18. Hinte, Holger & Rinne, Ulf & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2015. "Flüchtlinge in Deutschland: Realismus statt Illusionen," IZA Standpunkte 83, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    19. Bedaso, Fenet, 2021. "The Labor Market Integration of Refugees and other Migrants in Germany," GLO Discussion Paper Series 884, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    20. Irena Kogan, 2015. "The role of immigration policies for immigrants’ selection and economic success," ImPRovE Working Papers 15/05, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    labor mobility; migration; European Union; refugees;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D02 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Institutions: Design, Formation, Operations, and Impact
    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:46. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/glabode.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/glabode.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.