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Challenged by Migration: Europe’s Options

Author

Listed:
  • Constant, Amelie F.
  • Zimmermann, Klaus F.

Abstract

This paper examines the migration and labor mobility in the European Union and elaborates on their importance for the existence of the EU. Against all measures of success, the current public debate seems to suggest that the political consensus that migration is beneficial is broken. This comes with a crisis of European institutions in general. Migration and labor mobility have not been at the origin of the perceived cultural shift. The EU in its current form and ambition could perfectly survive or collapse even if it solves its migration challenge. But it will most likely collapse, if it fails to solve the mobility issue by not preserving free internal labor mobility and not establishing a joint external migration policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Constant, Amelie F. & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2017. "Challenged by Migration: Europe’s Options," GLO Discussion Paper Series 46, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:46
    as

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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/156404/1/GLO_DP_0046.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michel Beine & Pauline Bourgeon & Jean-Charles Bricongne, 2013. "Aggregate Fluctuations and International Migration," CESifo Working Paper Series 4379, CESifo.
    2. Constant, Amelie & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2005. "Immigrant Performance and Selective Immigration Policy: A European Perspective," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 94-105.
    3. Corrado Giulietti, 2014. "The welfare magnet hypothesis and the welfare take-up of migrants," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-37, June.
    4. Alfonso Arpaia & Aron Kiss & Balazs Palvolgyi & Alessandro Turrini, 2016. "Labour mobility and labour market adjustment in the EU," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-21, December.
    5. Amelie F. Constant, 2014. "Do migrants take the jobs of native workers?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-10, May.
    6. Michel Beine & Pauline Bourgeon & Jean‐Charles Bricongne, 2019. "Aggregate Fluctuations and International Migration," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 121(1), pages 117-152, January.
    7. repec:iza:izawol:journl:y:2014:p:10 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:iza:izawol:journl:y:2014:p:37 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Challenged by Migration: Europe’s Options
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2017-06-02 17:24:10
    2. Challenged by migration: Europe’s options
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2018-04-09 18:41:10

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    labor mobility; migration; European Union; refugees;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D02 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Institutions: Design, Formation, Operations, and Impact
    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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