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The evolution of inequality in Latin America in the 21st century: What are the patterns, drivers and causes?

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  • Bogliacino, Francesco
  • Rojas Lozano, Daniel

Abstract

In this article, we show the evolution of inequality for the largest economies of the Latin American region in the 21st century, with separate consideration of income and wealth. We analyse the drivers of the changes in inequality and possible underlying causes, including the role of the new wave of leftist governments.

Suggested Citation

  • Bogliacino, Francesco & Rojas Lozano, Daniel, 2017. "The evolution of inequality in Latin America in the 21st century: What are the patterns, drivers and causes?," GLO Discussion Paper Series 57, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:57
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dirk-Jan Kraan, 2008. "Programme Budgeting in OECD countries," OECD Journal on Budgeting, OECD Publishing, vol. 7(4), pages 1-41.
    2. Francesco Bogliacino & Virginia Maestri, 2016. "Wealth Inequality and the Great Recession," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 51(2), pages 61-66, March.
    3. Atkinson, Anthony B., 2015. "Inequality: what can be done?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 101810, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Francisco Panizza, 2005. "Unarmed Utopia Revisited: The Resurgence of Left-of-Centre Politics in Latin America," Political Studies, Political Studies Association, vol. 53, pages 716-734, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Leonardo Gasparini, 2019. "La Desigualdad en su Laberinto: Hechos y Perspectivas sobre Desigualdad de Ingresos en América Latina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0256, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    2. Vanesa Jorda & Jose M. Alonso, 2020. "What works to mitigate and reduce relative (and absolute) inequality?: A systematic review," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2020-152, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    inequality; new left; income; wealth; social policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs
    • N16 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • N36 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • P52 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Studies of Particular Economies

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