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Income Inequality in Latin America and the Caribbean: Evidence from Household Surveys

  • Leonardo Gasparini

    ()

    (Centro de Estudios Distributivos, Laborales y Sociales (CEDLAS) FCE - UNLP)

This paper reports information on income inequality in Latin America and the Caribbean computed from a sample of more than 50 household surveys from 20 LAC countries from 1989 to 2001. Although the core of the statistics is on household income inequality, we also report results on aggregate welfare and polarization. Inequality has moderately increased in South America in the last decade. The two main exceptions are Argentina, with a very large inequality increase, and Brazil, where inequality actually decreased. Changes have not been significant in Central America and the Caribbean. Aggregate welfare has increased in most countries fueled by economic growth and despite unequalizing distributional changes.

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File URL: http://cedlas.econo.unlp.edu.ar/archivos_upload/doc_cedlas2.pdf
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Paper provided by CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata in its series CEDLAS, Working Papers with number 0002.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:dls:wpaper:0002
Contact details of provider: Postal: Calle 48 No555 - La Plata (1900)
Phone: 21- 1466
Fax: 54-21-25-9536
Web page: http://cedlas.econo.unlp.edu.ar/

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  1. Morley, S. & Vos, R., 1997. "Poverty and dualistic growth in Paraguay," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19004, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
  2. Leonardo Gasparini & Walter Sosa, 2001. "Assessing Aggregate Welfare: Growth and Inequality in Argentina," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 38(113), pages 49-71.
  3. Esteban, J. & Gradin, C. & Ray, D., 1999. "Extension of a Measure of Polarization, with an Application to the Income Distribution of Five OECD Countries," Papers 24, El Instituto de Estudios Economicos de Galicia Pedro Barrie de la Maza.
  4. Frank Cowell, 1998. "Measurement of inequality," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2084, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  5. Joan-Maria Esteban & Debraj Ray, 1991. "On the Measurement of Polarization," Boston University - Institute for Economic Development 18, Boston University, Institute for Economic Development.
  6. Wolfson, Michael C, 1994. "When Inequalities Diverge," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 353-58, May.
  7. Miguel Székely & Marianne Hilgert, 1999. "What's Behind the Inequality we Measure: An Investigation Using Latin American Data," Research Department Publications 4188, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
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