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Poles Apart? An Analysis Of The Meaning Of Polarization


  • Yoram Amiel
  • Frank Cowell
  • Xavier Ramos


Starting from the axiomatization of polarization contained in Esteban and Ray (1994 ) and Chakravarty and Majumder (2001 ), we investigate whether people's perceptions of income polarization are consistent with the key axioms. This is carried out using a questionnaire-experimental approach that combines both paper questionnaires and on-line interactive techniques. The responses suggest that important axioms which serve to differentiate polarization from inequality-e.g. increased bipolarization-as well as other distinctive features of polarization, i.e. the non-monotonous behavior attributed to polarization, are not widely accepted. Copyright 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation International Association for Research in Income and Wealth 2009.

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  • Yoram Amiel & Frank Cowell & Xavier Ramos, 2010. "Poles Apart? An Analysis Of The Meaning Of Polarization," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 56(1), pages 23-46, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:56:y:2010:i:1:p:23-46

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chiara Gigliarano & Pietro Muliere, 2012. "Measuring Income Polarization Using an Enlarged Middle Class," Working Papers 271, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.

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