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Cost Efficiency of Domestic and Foreign Banks in Thailand: Evidence from Panel Data

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  • Chantapong, Saovanee
  • Menkhoff, Lukas

Abstract

The paper estimates and compares cost efficiency of domestic and foreign banks in Thailand by using bank-panel data between 1995 and 2003. It also examines the effect of foreign bank entry on banking efficiency in Thailand since the significant acquisitions by foreign banks after the 1997 financial crisis. The widely used translog functional form specification is statistically tested by pooled regressions. The estimated results suggest that the unit costs of production of domestic and foreign banks are indistinguishable, although the two types of banks focus on different areas of the banking business. The findings suggest that based on bank operating efficiency, if foreign banks represent the best-practice banks in the industry, to a large extent, domestic banks in Thailand have caught up to the best-practice standards throughout 1995-2003, significantly after the 1997 financial crisis . This may be due to greater foreign participation through acquisitions, which increases the competitive pressure in the banking industry, and also to financial restructuring of domestic banks, which increases the cost efficiency of domestic banks, thereby benefiting banking customers.

Suggested Citation

  • Chantapong, Saovanee & Menkhoff, Lukas, 2005. "Cost Efficiency of Domestic and Foreign Banks in Thailand: Evidence from Panel Data," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Kiel 2005 9, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:gdec05:3482
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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/19802/1/Chantapong.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Itthipong Mahathanaseth & Loren W. Tauer, 2014. "Performance of Thailand banks after the 1997 East Asian financial crisis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(30), pages 3763-3776, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Banks; Financial Policy; Capital and Ownership Structure; Cost Efficiency;

    JEL classification:

    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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