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The effects of increasing the standards of the high school curriculum on school dropout

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  • Görlitz, Katja
  • Gravert, Christina

Abstract

This paper evaluates the effects of a high school curriculum reform that was introduced in one German state on high school dropout. The reform increased the standards of the curriculum by reducing the freedom of choice in course selection (amongst other things) resulting in an increase in the level and the weekly teaching hours in the subjects German, a foreign language, mathematics and natural sciences. Using a quasi-experimental evaluation design exploiting variation across time and states, we identify the reform effect on students' probability to graduate from high school. The results show that high school dropout rates have increased for males and females alike. However, the effect for males vanishes two years after reform implementation, while it remains persistent for females even after three years.

Suggested Citation

  • Görlitz, Katja & Gravert, Christina, 2015. "The effects of increasing the standards of the high school curriculum on school dropout," Discussion Papers 2015/1, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:fubsbe:20151
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    Cited by:

    1. Huebener, Mathias & Marcus, Jan, 2017. "Compressing instruction time into fewer years of schooling and the impact on student performance," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 1-14.
    2. Görlitz, Katja & Gravert, Christina, 2015. "The Effects of a High School Curriculum Reform on University Enrollment and the Choice of College Major," IZA Discussion Papers 8983, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    high school curriculum reform; high school dropout; school performance;

    JEL classification:

    • D04 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Policy: Formulation; Implementation; Evaluation
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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