IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/cfswop/201316.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

High frequency trading and end-of-day price dislocation

Author

Listed:
  • Aitken, Michael
  • Cumming, Douglas
  • Zhan, Feng

Abstract

We show that the presence of high frequency trading (HFT) has significantly mitigated the frequency and severity of end-of-day price dislocation, counter to recent concerns expressed in the media. The effect of HFT is more pronounced on days when end of day price dislocation is more likely to be the result of market manipulation on days of option expiry dates and end of month. Moreover, the effect of HFT is more pronounced than the role of trading rules, surveillance, enforcement and legal conditions in curtailing the frequency and severity of end-ofday price dislocation. We show our findings are robust to different proxies of the start of HFT by trade size, cancellation of orders, and co-location.

Suggested Citation

  • Aitken, Michael & Cumming, Douglas & Zhan, Feng, 2013. "High frequency trading and end-of-day price dislocation," CFS Working Paper Series 2013/16, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:cfswop:201316
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/87680/1/771626649.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bajgrowicz, Pierre & Scaillet, Olivier, 2012. "Technical trading revisited: False discoveries, persistence tests, and transaction costs," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(3), pages 473-491.
    2. Rafael Porta & Florencio Lopez-De-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer, 2006. "What Works in Securities Laws?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 61(1), pages 1-32, February.
    3. William A. Branch & George W. Evans, 2011. "Learning about Risk and Return: A Simple Model of Bubbles and Crashes," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 159-191, July.
    4. Ajeyo Banerjee & E. Woodrow Eckard, 2001. "Why Regulate Insider Trading? Evidence from the First Great Merger Wave (1897-1903)," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1329-1349, December.
    5. Jackson, Howell E. & Roe, Mark J., 2009. "Public and private enforcement of securities laws: Resource-based evidence," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 207-238, August.
    6. Allen, Franklin & Gorton, Gary, 1992. "Stock price manipulation, market microstructure and asymmetric information," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(2-3), pages 624-630, April.
    7. Mark M. Carhart & Ron Kaniel & David K. Musto & Adam V. Reed, 2002. "Leaning for the Tape: Evidence of Gaming Behavior in Equity Mutual Funds," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 57(2), pages 661-693, April.
    8. Mitchell A. Petersen, 2009. "Estimating Standard Errors in Finance Panel Data Sets: Comparing Approaches," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 22(1), pages 435-480, January.
    9. Rafael La Porta & Florencio Lopez-de-Silanes & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1998. "Law and Finance," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(6), pages 1113-1155, December.
    10. Allen, Franklin & Gale, Douglas, 1992. "Stock-Price Manipulation," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 5(3), pages 503-529.
    11. Pirrong, Craig, 1999. "The organization of financial exchange markets: Theory and evidence," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 329-357, November.
    12. Scholtus, Martin & van Dijk, Dick & Frijns, Bart, 2014. "Speed, algorithmic trading, and market quality around macroeconomic news announcements," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 89-105.
    13. anonymous, 2011. "Focus on Authors," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 30(2), pages 385-388, 03-04.
    14. Djankov, Simeon & La Porta, Rafael & Lopez-de-Silanes, Florencio & Shleifer, Andrei, 2008. "The law and economics of self-dealing," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(3), pages 430-465, June.
    15. Xue, Yi & Gençay, Ramazan, 2012. "Trading frequency and volatility clustering," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 760-773.
    16. Brogaard, Jonathan & Hendershott, Terrence & Riordan, Ryan, 2013. "High frequency trading and price discovery," Working Paper Series 1602, European Central Bank.
    17. Cumming, D. & Johan, S.A., 2008. "Global market surveillance," Discussion Paper 2008-002, Tilburg University, Tilburg Law and Economic Center.
    18. Carrion, Allen, 2013. "Very fast money: High-frequency trading on the NASDAQ," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 680-711.
    19. Peng, Lin & Röell, Ailsa A, 2009. "Managerial Incentives and Stock Price Manipulation," CEPR Discussion Papers 7442, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    20. Jeffrey MacIntosh, 2013. "High Frequency Traders: Angels or Devils?," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 391, October.
    21. Craig Pirrong, 2004. "Detecting Manipulation in Futures Markets: The Ferruzzi Soybean Episode," American Law and Economics Review, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(1), pages 28-71.
    22. Merrick, John Jr & Naik, Narayan Y. & Yadav, Pradeep K., 2005. "Strategic trading behavior and price distortion in a manipulated market: anatomy of a squeeze," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 171-218, July.
    23. Hillion, Pierre & Suominen, Matti, 2004. "The manipulation of closing prices," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 351-375, October.
    24. Terrence Hendershott & Charles M. Jones & Albert J. Menkveld, 2011. "Does Algorithmic Trading Improve Liquidity?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 66(1), pages 1-33, February.
    25. David Easley & Marcos M. López de Prado & Maureen O'Hara, 2012. "Flow Toxicity and Liquidity in a High-frequency World," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 25(5), pages 1457-1493.
    26. Buti,Marco & Deroose,Servaas & Gaspar,Vitor & Martins,João Nogueira (ed.), 2010. "The Euro," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9789279098420, May.
    27. Alain P. Chaboud & Benjamin Chiquoine & Erik Hjalmarsson & Clara Vega, 2009. "Rise of the machines: algorithmic trading in the foreign exchange market," International Finance Discussion Papers 980, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    28. anonymous, 2011. "Focus on Authors," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 30(3), pages 562-564, 05-06.
    29. Menkveld, Albert J., 2013. "High frequency trading and the new market makers," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 712-740.
    30. Comerton-Forde, Carole & Putnins, Talis J., 2011. "Measuring closing price manipulation," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 135-158, April.
    31. anonymous, 2011. "Focus on Authors," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 30(1), pages 187-190, 01-02.
    32. Holger Spamann, 2010. "The "Antidirector Rights Index" Revisited," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 23(2), pages 467-486, February.
    33. Cumming, Douglas & Johan, Sofia & Li, Dan, 2011. "Exchange trading rules and stock market liquidity," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(3), pages 651-671, March.
    34. Rajesh K. Aggarwal & Guojun Wu, 2006. "Stock Market Manipulations," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 79(4), pages 1915-1954, July.
    35. Carole Comerton-Forde & James Rydge, 2006. "Market Integrity and Surveillance Effort," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 29(2), pages 149-172, April.
    36. Tālis J. Putniņš, 2012. "Market Manipulation: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(5), pages 952-967, December.
    37. Edelen, Roger M. & Kadlec, Gregory B., 2012. "Delegated trading and the speed of adjustment in security prices," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(2), pages 294-307.
    38. Carole Comerton-Forde & Tālis J. Putniņš, 2014. "Stock Price Manipulation: Prevalence and Determinants," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 18(1), pages 23-66.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Jeffrey MacIntosh, 2013. "High Frequency Traders: Angels or Devils?," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 391, October.
    2. Agarwalla, Sobhesh Kumar & Jacob, Joshy & Varma, Jayanth R., 2014. "High Frequency Manipulation at Futures Expiry: The Case of Cash Settled Indian Single Stock Futures," IIMA Working Papers WP2014-02-01, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Research and Publication Department.
    3. Cumming, Douglas & Dannhauser, Robert & Johan, Sofia, 2015. "Financial market misconduct and agency conflicts: A synthesis and future directions," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 150-168.
    4. Aitken, Michael & Cumming, Douglas & Zhan, Feng, 2015. "Exchange trading rules, surveillance and suspected insider trading," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 311-330.
    5. Atanasov, Vladimir & Davies, Ryan J. & Merrick, John J., 2015. "Financial intermediaries in the midst of market manipulation: Did they protect the fool or help the knave?," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 210-234.
    6. Carlos Lenczewski, 2016. "The Role of High-Frequency Traders in the Foreign Exchange Market Bid-Ask Spreads," EUSP Department of Economics Working Paper Series Ec-01/16, European University at St. Petersburg, Department of Economics.
    7. Anand, Amber & Venkataraman, Kumar, 2016. "Market conditions, fragility, and the economics of market making," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(2), pages 327-349.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    High frequency trading; End-of-day Price dislocation; Manipulation; Trading Rules; Surveillance; Law and Finance;

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • K22 - Law and Economics - - Regulation and Business Law - - - Business and Securities Law

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:cfswop:201316. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ifkcfde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.