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Competition between exchanges: Euronext versus Xetra

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  • Kasch-Haroutounian, Maria
  • Theissen, Erik

Abstract

Exchanges in Europe are in a process of consolidation. After the failure of the proposed merger between Deutsche Börse and Euronext, these two groups are likely to become the nuclei for further mergers and co-operation with currently independent exchanges. A decision for one of the groups entails a decision for the respective trading platform. Against that background we evaluate the attractiveness of the two dominant continental European trading systems. Though both are anonymous electronic limit order books, there are important differences in the trading protocols. We use a matched-sample approach to compare execution costs in Euronext Paris and Xetra. We find that both quoted and effective spreads are lower in Xetra. When decomposing the spread we find no systematic differences in the adverse selection component. Realized spreads, on the other hand, are significantly higher in Euronext. Neither differences in the number of liquidity provision agreements nor differences in the minimum tick size or in the degree of domestic competition for order flow explain the different spread levels. We thus conclude that Xetra is the more efficient trading system.

Suggested Citation

  • Kasch-Haroutounian, Maria & Theissen, Erik, 2006. "Competition between exchanges: Euronext versus Xetra," CFS Working Paper Series 2007/19, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:cfswop:200719
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ronen, Tavy & Weaver, Daniel G., 2001. "'Teenies' anyone?," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 231-260, June.
    2. Affleck-Graves, John & Hegde, Shantaram P & Miller, Robert E, 1994. " Trading Mechanisms and the Components of the Bid-Ask Spread," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(4), pages 1471-1488, September.
    3. Huang, Roger D. & Stoll, Hans R., 1996. "Dealer versus auction markets: A paired comparison of execution costs on NASDAQ and the NYSE," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 313-357, July.
    4. Domowitz, Ian & Glen, Jack & Madhavan, Ananth, 2001. "Liquidity, Volatility and Equity Trading Costs across Countries and over Time," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(2), pages 221-255, Summer.
    5. Kumar Venkataraman, 2001. "Automated Versus Floor Trading: An Analysis of Execution Costs on the Paris and New York Exchanges," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(4), pages 1445-1485, August.
    6. Nicholas Taylor, 2002. "Competition on the London Stock Exchange," European Financial Management, European Financial Management Association, vol. 8(4), pages 399-419.
    7. Battalio, Robert & Greene, Jason & Jennings, Robert, 1997. "Do Competing Specialists and Preferencing Dealers Affect Market Quality?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 10(4), pages 969-993.
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    Cited by:

    1. Susan Thomas, 2010. "Call auctions: A Solution to some difficulties in Indian finance," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2010-006, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    2. Gomber, Peter & Schweickert, Uwe & Theissen, Erik, 2011. "Liquidity dynamics in an electronic open limit order book: An event study approach," CFR Working Papers 11-14, University of Cologne, Centre for Financial Research (CFR).
    3. Idier, J., 2006. "Stock exchanges industry consolidation and shock transmission," Working papers 159, Banque de France.
    4. Giofré, Maela, 2013. "International diversification: Households versus institutional investors," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 145-176.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Competition between Exchanges;

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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