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Job polarization on local labor markets?

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  • Uwe Blien

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  • Wolfgang Dauth

Abstract

In most industrialized countries, employment has grown predominately in jobs at the upper and lower tails of the wage distribution, while employment in the middle part of the distribution has stagnated or declined. This process of job polarization is well documented for a number of countries. We propose a straightforward way to measure the actual magnitude of job polarization and use this measure to compare polarization across German local labor markets. Job polarization almost exclusively occurs in urban areas where the hypothesis of routine biased technological change is most likely to prevail.

Suggested Citation

  • Uwe Blien & Wolfgang Dauth, 2016. "Job polarization on local labor markets?," ERSA conference papers ersa16p114, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa16p114
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephan, Gesine & Uthmann, Sven, 2014. "Akzeptanz von Vergeltungsmaßnahmen am Arbeitsplatz : Befunde aus einer quasi-experimentellen Untersuchung," IAB Discussion Paper 201427, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    2. Mario Reinhold, 2016. "On the Link between Job Polarisation and Wage Inequality - A regional approach for Germany," ERSA conference papers ersa16p361, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Terry Gregory & A.M. Salomons & Ulrich Zierahn, 2016. "Racing With or Against the Machine? Evidence from Europe," Working Papers 16-05, Utrecht School of Economics.
    4. Mabel Sánchez Barrioluengo, 2019. "Job Composition and Its Effect on UK Firms in the Digital Era," SPRU Working Paper Series 2019-24, SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit, University of Sussex Business School.
    5. Reinhold, Mario, 2016. "On the Link between Job Polarisation and Wage Inequality in Germany," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145802, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Gornig, Martin & Goebel, Jan, 2018. "Deindustrialisation and the polarisation of household incomes: The example of urban agglomerations in Germany," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 790-806.
    7. Maarten Goos & Melanie Arntz & Ulrich Zierahn & Terry Gregory & Stephanie Carretero Gomez & Ignacio Gonzalez Vazquez & Koen Jonkers, 2019. "The Impact of Technological Innovation on the Future of Work," JRC Working Papers on Labour, Education and Technology 2019-03, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    8. Juan Ramón GARCÍA, 2018. "Galicia Ante Reto De La Automatización Del Trabajo," Revista Galega de Economía, University of Santiago de Compostela. Faculty of Economics and Business., vol. 27(3), pages 17-28.
    9. Davide Consoli & Mabel Sánchez-Barrioluengo, 2016. "Polarization and the growth of low-skill employment in Spanish Local Labor Markets," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1628, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Nov 2016.
    10. Breidenbach, Philipp & Döhrn, Roland & Neumann, Uwe, 2016. "Stellungsnahme zum Antrag "Wirtschaftspolitische Kehrtwende endlich einleiten"," RWI Projektberichte, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, number 147042.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    job polarization; local labor markets; job tasks; routine biased technological change; structural change;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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