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Distance is crucially important, at least for neighbors' foreign employment at the district level

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  • Wolfgang Nagl

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  • Robert Lehmann

Abstract

This paper investigates the main determinants of the regional representation of foreign employees in Germany. Since migration determinants are not necessarily the same for workers of different nationalities, we explain spatial patterns not only for total foreign employment but also for the 35 most important migration countries to Germany. Based on a total census for all 402 districts in Germany, we find a large heterogeneity in migration determinants between nationalities. We identify three groups of countries for which labor market and economic conditions, amenities or cultural factors are more important. Geographical distance plays a major role in location decisions, a finding that is especially pronounced for workers from countries neighboring Germany.
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Suggested Citation

  • Wolfgang Nagl & Robert Lehmann, 2015. "Distance is crucially important, at least for neighbors' foreign employment at the district level," ERSA conference papers ersa15p366, European Regional Science Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa15p366
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration costs; Distance; Foreign Employment;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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