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The Sector Bias of Skill-biased Technical Change and the Rising Skill Premium in Transition Economies

Author

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  • Piero Esposito
  • Robert Stehrer

    (The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw)

Abstract

In this paper we test the hypothesis that the sector bias of skill-biased technical change is important in explaining the rising relative wage of skilled workers in the manufacturing sector in three Central and Eastern European transition countries. The evidence for Hungary and Poland is consistent with the sector bias being important in explaining the rising wage premium; the hypotheses is however not confirmed for the Czech Republic.

Suggested Citation

  • Piero Esposito & Robert Stehrer, 2007. "The Sector Bias of Skill-biased Technical Change and the Rising Skill Premium in Transition Economies," wiiw Working Papers 43, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
  • Handle: RePEc:wii:wpaper:43
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Aleksandra Parteka & Joanna Wolszczak-Derlacz, 2015. "Integrated sectors - diversified earnings: the (missing) impact of offshoring on wages and wage convergence in the EU27," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 13(3), pages 325-350, September.
    2. Cazzavillan, Guido & Olszewski, Krzysztof, 2011. "Skill-biased technological change, endogenous labor supply and growth: A model and calibration to Poland and the US," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 124-136, June.
    3. Eleonora Cavallaro & Piero Esposito & Alessia Matano & Marcella Mulino, 2013. "Technological Catching Up, Quality of Exports, and Competitiveness: A Sectoral Perspective," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(6), pages 4-21, November.
    4. Behar Alberto, 2012. "Skill-Biased Technology Imports, Increased Schooling Access, and Income Inequality in Developing Countries," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 2(2), pages 1-32, January.
    5. Éva Polgár & Julia Wörz, 2010. "No risk and some fun? Trade and wages in the enlarged European Union," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 37(2), pages 127-163, May.
    6. Eva Katalin Polgar & Julia Woerz, 2011. "Trade With Central and Eastern Europe: Is It Really a Threat to Wages in the West?," DANUBE: Law and Economics Review, European Association Comenius - EACO, issue 1, pages 1-31, March.
    7. Juan Jung, 2012. "Externalities and Absorptive Capacity in a context of Spatial Dependence: The case of European Regions," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 2212, Department of Economics - dECON.
    8. Brzezinski, Michal, 2018. "Income inequality and the Great Recession in Central and Eastern Europe," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 219-247.
    9. Alessia Lo Turco & Aleksandra Parteka, 2011. "The demand for skills and labour costs in partner countries," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 19(3), pages 611-637, July.
    10. Thomas Brasch, 2016. "Identifying the sector bias of technical change," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 50(2), pages 595-621, March.
    11. Žilvinas Martinaitis & Aleksandr Christenko & Jonas AntanaviÄ ius, 2021. "Upskilling, Deskilling or Polarisation? Evidence on Change in Skills in Europe," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 35(3), pages 451-469, June.
    12. Pi, Jiancai & Zhang, Pengqing, 2018. "Skill-biased technological change and wage inequality in developing countries," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 347-362.
    13. Brixiova, Zuzana & Li, Wenli & Yousef, Tarik, 2009. "Skill shortages and labor market outcomes in Central Europe," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 45-59, March.
    14. Piero Esposito & Robert Stehrer, 2012. "The Effects of High-tech Capital, FDI and Outsourcing on Demand for Skills in West and East," Chapters, in: Matilde Mas & Robert Stehrer (ed.), Industrial Productivity in Europe, chapter 13, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Thomas von Brasch, 2015. "Indentifying the sector bias of technical change," Discussion Papers 795, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    16. Aleksandra Parteka, 2012. "Skilled-Unskilled Wage Gap Versus Evolving Trade And Labour Market Structures in the EU," Working Papers 1204, Instytut Rozwoju, Institute for Development.
    17. Sami SAAFI, 2009. "Innovations technologiques, mobilité et demande de main-d’oeuvre qualifiée. Une analyse des industries tunisiennes (Technological innovations, mobility and skilled-labour deamnd : an analysis of tunis," Working Papers 206, Laboratoire de Recherche sur l'Industrie et l'Innovation. ULCO / Research Unit on Industry and Innovation.
    18. Ribeiro, Ana Paula & Carvalho, Vitor & Ferreira, Mariana, 2020. "The effect of globalization on wage inequality: an application to the European Union before the Great Recession," MPRA Paper 110697, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. repec:onb:oenbwp:y:2009:i:1:b:1 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Sang‐Wook (Stanley) Cho & Julián P. Díaz, 2016. "Accounting for Skill Premium Patterns: Evidence from the EU Accession," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 83(1), pages 271-299, July.
    21. Marco Biagetti & Sergio Scicchitano, 2012. "Returns to Schooling in Europe: Evidence From Quantile Regression on EU-SILC Data," Journal of Knowledge Management, Economics and Information Technology, ScientificPapers.org, vol. 2(5), pages 1-9, October.
    22. Mr. Alberto Behar, 2013. "The Endogenous Skill Bias of Technical Change and Inequality in Developing Countries," IMF Working Papers 2013/050, International Monetary Fund.
    23. Sang-Wook (Stanley) Cho & Juliàn P. Dìaz, 2014. "Accounting for Skill Premium Patterns during the EU Accession: Productivity or Trade?," Discussion Papers 2014-14, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    skill premium; factor prices; biased technical change; transition;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C62 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Existence and Stability Conditions of Equilibrium
    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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