IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/wbk/wbrwps/7521.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Development economics as taught in developing countries

Author

Listed:
  • Mckenzie,David J.
  • Paffhausen,Anna Luisa

Abstract

This paper uses a combination of survey questions to instructors and data collected from course syllabi and examinations to examine how the subject of development economics is taught at the undergraduate and masters levels in developing countries, and benchmark this against undergraduate classes in the United States. The study finds that there is considerable heterogeneity in what is considered development economics: there is a narrow core of only a small set of topics such as growth theory, poverty and inequality, human capital, and institutions taught in at least half the classes, with substantial variation in other topics covered. In developing countries, development economics is taught largely as a theoretical subject coupled with case studies, with few courses emphasizing data or empirical methods and findings. This approach contrasts with the approach taken in leading U.S. economics departments and with the evolution of development economics research. The analysis finds that country income per capita, the role of the state in the economy, the education level in the country, and the involvement of the instructor in research are associated with how close a course is to the frontier. The results suggest there are important gaps in how development economics is taught.

Suggested Citation

  • Mckenzie,David J. & Paffhausen,Anna Luisa, 2015. "Development economics as taught in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7521, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7521
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2015/12/21/090224b083f4ce8b/1_0/Rendered/PDF/Development0ec0developing0countries.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Naudé, Wim, 2012. "Entrepreneurship and economic development: Theory, evidence and policy," MERIT Working Papers 2012-027, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. David L. Lindauer & Lant Pritchett, 2002. "What’s the Big Idea? The Third Generation of Policies for Economic Growth," Economía Journal, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2002), pages 1-40, August.
    3. Banerjee, Abhijit & Bardhan, Pranab & Basu, Kaushik, 2005. "New Directions in Development Economics: Theory or Empirics? A Symposium in Economic and Political Weekly," Working Papers 127128, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    4. Sam Allgood & William B. Walstad & John J. Siegfried, 2015. "Research on Teaching Economics to Undergraduates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 53(2), pages 285-325, June.
    5. Hollis Chenery† & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), 1988. "Handbook of Development Economics," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier, edition 1, volume 1, number 1.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Michael R. Hammock & P. Wesley Routon & Jay K. Walker, 2016. "The opinions of economics majors before and after learning economics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 76-83, January.
    2. Rita A. Balaban & Donna B. Gilleskie & Uyen Tran, 2016. "A quantitative evaluation of the flipped classroom in a large lecture principles of economics course," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(4), pages 269-287, October.
    3. William B. Walstad & Jamie Wagner, 2016. "The disaggregation of value-added test scores to assess learning outcomes in economics courses," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(2), pages 121-131, April.
    4. J.R. Clark & Joshua C. Hall & Ashley S. Harrison, 2017. "The Relative Value of AER P&P Economic Education Papers," Working Papers 17-23, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    5. Richard Baldwin & Rikard Forslid, 2019. "Globotics and development: When manufacturing is jobless and services are tradable," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2019-94, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    6. Ishuan Li & Robert Simonson, 2016. "Capstone senior research course in economics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(2), pages 161-167, April.
    7. Tim Kaiser & Luis Oberrauch & Günther Seeber, 2020. "Measuring economic competence of secondary school students in Germany," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(3-4), pages 227-242, August.
    8. V. L. Tambovtsev, 2019. "Institutions-technologies interaction and economic growth," Journal of New Economy, Ural State University of Economics, vol. 20(2), pages 55-70, May.
    9. Ricardo Adrogué & Martin Cerisola & Gaston Gelos, 2010. "Brazil's long-term growth performance: trying to explain the puzzle," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(4), pages 356-376, September.
    10. Jordi Brandts & Isabel Busom & Cristina Lopez-Mayan & Judith Panadés, 2019. "Dispelling Misconceptions about Economics," Working Papers 1096, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    11. Jean Cartier-Bresson, 2013. "Le pouvoir du positivisme et ses limites : microéconométrie et macroéconométrie actuelles du développement," Working Papers hal-00847005, HAL.
    12. Urban, Janina & Rommel, Florian, 2020. "German economics: Its current form and content," Working Paper Series 56, Cusanus Hochschule für Gesellschaftsgestaltung, Institut für Ökonomie.
    13. Bruce Morley, 2016. "Teaching empirical finance courses: A project on portfolio management," Cogent Economics & Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(1), pages 1167157-116, December.
    14. Alberto Melo & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 2006. "Productive Development Policies and Supporting Institutions in Latin America and The Caribbean," Research Department Publications 1005, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    15. Chamberlin, Jordan, 2013. "Infrastructure, services, and smallholder income growth: evidence from Kenyan panel data," 2013 Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161269, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    16. Duflo, Esther & Glennerster, Rachel & Kremer, Michael, 2008. "Using Randomization in Development Economics Research: A Toolkit," Handbook of Development Economics, in: T. Paul Schultz & John A. Strauss (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 61, pages 3895-3962, Elsevier.
    17. Carlos J. Asarta & Austin S. Jennings & Paul W. Grimes, 2017. "Economic Education Retrospective," The American Economist, Sage Publications, vol. 62(1), pages 102-117, March.
    18. Murat Üngör, 2009. "De-industrialization of the Riches and the Rise of China," DEGIT Conference Papers c014_040, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    19. Isabel Busom & Cristina Lopez-Mayan, 2015. "Student Preconceptions and Learning Economic Reasoning," Working Papers 862, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    20. Lundvall , Bengt-Åke & Vang , Jan & Joseph , KJ & Chaminade , Cristina, 2013. "Bridging Innovation System Research and Development Studies: challenges and research opportunities," Papers in Innovation Studies 2013/33, Lund University, CIRCLE - Centre for Innovation Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Pro-Poor Growth; Economic Theory&Research; Labor Policies; Tertiary Education; Effective Schools and Teachers;
    All these keywords.

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:7521. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Roula I. Yazigi (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/dvewbus.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.