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Expanding Trade within Africa: The Impact of Trade Facilitation

  • Njinkeu, Dominique

    (International Lawyers and Economists Against Poverty (ILEAP))

  • S. Wilson, John

    ()

    (The World Bank)

  • Powo Fosso, Bruno

    (Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC))

Registered author(s):

    This paper examines the impact of trade facilitation on intra-African trade. The authors examine the role of trade facilitation reforms, such as increased port efficiency, improved customs, and regulatory environments, and upgrading services infrastructure on trade between African countries. They also consider how regional trade agreements relate to intra-African trade flows. Using trade data from 2003 to 2004, they find that improvement in ports and services infrastructure promise relatively more expansion in intra-African trade than other measures. They also show that, almost all regional trade agreements have a positive effect on trade flows

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    Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 4790.

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    Length: 31 pages
    Date of creation: 01 Dec 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4790
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    2. Andrew K. Rose, 2001. "Currency unions and trade: the effect is large," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 16(33), pages 449-461, October.
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    8. Augstin Kwasi Fosu, 2003. "Political Instability and Export Performance in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(4), pages 68-83.
    9. Dani Rodrik, 1998. "Trade Policy and Economic Performance in Sub-Saharan Africa," NBER Working Papers 6562, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    12. Ximena Clark & David Dollar & Alejandro Micco, 2004. "Port Efficiency, Maritime Transport Costs and Bilateral Trade," NBER Working Papers 10353, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Yongzheng Yang & Sanjeev Gupta, 2007. "Regional Trade Arrangements in Africa: Past Performance and the Way Forward," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 19(3), pages 399-431.
    14. Foroutan, Faezeh & Pritchett, Lant, 1993. "Intra - Sub - Saharan African trade : is it too little?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1225, The World Bank.
    15. Choi, Changkyu, 2003. "Does the Internet stimulate inward foreign direct investment?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 319-326, June.
    16. Anderson, James E, 1979. "A Theoretical Foundation for the Gravity Equation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(1), pages 106-16, March.
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