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Estimating the returns to education in Argentina : 1992-2002


  • Giovagnoli, Paula Ines
  • Fiszbein, Ariel
  • Patrinos, Harry Anthony


The authors estimate returns to schooling in urban Argentina for a 10-year period. In addition to comparable earnings functions, they also estimate the returns using quantile regression analysis to detect differences in the returns across the distribution. Over time, men in higher quantiles have higher returns to schooling compared with those in the lower quantiles. For women, returns are highest at the lowest quantile. The returns to education increased during the past decade. The authors do not rule out that increased demand for skills is driving the increasing returns over the decade.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovagnoli, Paula Ines & Fiszbein, Ariel & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2005. "Estimating the returns to education in Argentina : 1992-2002," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3715, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3715

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    8. Mwabu, Germano & Schultz, T Paul, 1996. "Education Returns across Quantiles of the Wage Function: Alternative Explanations for Returns to Education by Race in South Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 335-339, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Florencia López Bóo, 2012. "In School or at Work? Evidence from a Crisis," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(3), pages 381-404, September.
    2. López Bóo, Florencia, 2010. "Returns to Education and Macroeconomic Shocks: Evidence from Argentina," IZA Discussion Papers 4753, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Demombynes, Gabriel & Metzler, Johannes, 2008. "Connecting the unobserved dots : a decomposition analysis of changes in earnings inequality in urban Argentina, 1980-2002," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4624, The World Bank.

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