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Gender, poverty, and nonfarm employment in Ghana and Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Newman, Constance
  • Canagarajah, Sudharshan

Abstract

The authors provide evidence that women's non-farm activities help reduce poverty in two economically and culturally different countries, Ghana and Uganda. In both countries rural poverty rates were lowest - and fell most rapidly - for female heads of household engaged in non-farm activities. Participation in non-farm activities increased more rapidly for women, especially married women and female heads of household, than for men. Women were more likely than men to combine agriculture and non-farm activities. In Ghana it was non-farm activities (for which income data are available ) that provided the highest average incomes and the highest shares of income. Bivariate profit analysis of participation shows that in Uganda female heads of household and in Ghana women in general are significantly more likely than men to participate in non-farm activities and less likely to participate in agriculture.

Suggested Citation

  • Newman, Constance & Canagarajah, Sudharshan, 2000. "Gender, poverty, and nonfarm employment in Ghana and Uganda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2367, The World Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:2367
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Reardon, Thomas, 1997. "Using evidence of household income diversification to inform study of the rural nonfarm labor market in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 735-747, May.
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    5. Adams, Richard H, Jr, 2002. "Nonfarm Income, Inequality, and Land in Rural Egypt," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 50(2), pages 339-363, January.
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    7. Canagarajah, Sudharshan & Mazumdar, Dipak & Xiao Ye, 1998. "The structure and determinants of inequality and poverty reduction in Ghana, 1988-92," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1998, The World Bank.
    8. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Haddad, Lawrence James & Peña, Christine, 1995. "Gender and poverty," FCND discussion papers 9, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    12. Rosenhouse, S., 1989. "Identifying The Poor," Papers 58, World Bank - Living Standards Measurement.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bagamba, Fredrick & Burger, Kees & Kuyvenhoven, Arie, 2007. "Determinants of smallholder farmer labour allocation decisions in Uganda," 106th Seminar, October 25-27, 2007, Montpellier, France 7920, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Maitreyi Bordia Das, 2003. "The other side of self-employment : household enterprises in India," Social Protection and Labor Policy and Technical Notes 27873, The World Bank.
    3. Yakovleva, Natalia, 2007. "Perspectives on female participation in artisanal and small-scale mining: A case study of Birim North District of Ghana," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(1-2), pages 29-41.

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