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Climate Change and the Willingness to Pay to Reduce Ecological and Health Risks from Wastewater Flooding in Urban Centers and the Environment

  • Marcella Veronesi


    (Department of Economics (University of Verona))

  • Fabienne Chawla


    (Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology)

  • Max Maurer


    (Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology)

  • Judit Lienert


    (Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology)

Climate change scenarios predict an increase of extreme rain events, which will increase the risk of wastewater flooding and of missing legal water quality targets. This study elicits the willingness to pay to reduce ecological and health risks from combined sewer overflows in rivers and lakes, and wastewater flooding of residential and commercial zones under the uncertainty of climate change. We implement a discrete choice experiment on a large representative sample of the Swiss population. Swiss households strongly value the protection of water bodies, and mostly, the avoidance of high ecological risks and health risks for children related to combined sewer overflows in rivers and lakes. Our findings also show that climate change perception has a significant effect on the willingness to pay to reduce these risks. These results are important to support policy makers’ decisions on how to deal with emerging risks of climate change in the water sector and where to set priorities.

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Paper provided by University of Verona, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 01/2013.

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Length: 29
Date of creation: Jan 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Ecological Economics 98, February 2014: 1-10.
Handle: RePEc:ver:wpaper:01/2013
Contact details of provider: Postal: Vicolo Campofiore, 2 - I-37129 Verona
Phone: +390458028097
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