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Valuation of cancer and microbial disease risk reductions in municipal drinking water: An analysis of risk context using multiple valuation methods

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  • Adamowicz, Wiktor
  • Dupont, Diane
  • Krupnick, Alan
  • Zhang, Jing

Abstract

We examine the value of health risk reductions (microbial illnesses/deaths and bladder cancer illnesses/deaths) in the context of drinking water quality treatment by public systems. When we assume that combined mortality and morbidity risk reductions are equally spread in the future; our results suggest that microbial risk-reduction programs have higher value than cancer risk-reduction programs, but that mortality risk reduction values are not significantly different for cancer and microbials. However, when a 25-year cancer latency is accounted for and a 5% discount rate is used, the value of cancer mortality risk reductions exceeds the value for microbial risk reductions. We also address a number of methodological issues, including performance of alternative choice experiment estimation (CE) techniques, relationship of CE to contingent valuation results, and implications for incorporating morbidity and mortality endpoints in the same survey instrument.

Suggested Citation

  • Adamowicz, Wiktor & Dupont, Diane & Krupnick, Alan & Zhang, Jing, 2011. "Valuation of cancer and microbial disease risk reductions in municipal drinking water: An analysis of risk context using multiple valuation methods," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 213-226, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeeman:v:61:y:2011:i:2:p:213-226
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    References listed on IDEAS

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