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Investing in Health: The Long-Term Impact of Head Start

Author

Listed:
  • Kathryn Anderson

    () (Department of Economics, Vanderbilt University)

  • James Foster

    () (Department of Economics, Vanderbilt University)

  • David Frisvold

    () (Graduate Student at Vanderbilt University)

Abstract

Head Start is a comprehensive, early childhood development program designed to augment the human capital and health capital levels of disadvantaged children. Grossman's (1972) health capital model suggests that early investments of this type should have lasting effects on health outcomes. This research evaluates the impact of Head Start on long-term health by comparing health outcome and behavioral indicators of adults who attended Head Start with those of siblings who did not. The results suggest that there are long-term health benefits from participation in Head Start and that these benefits result from lifestyle changes.

Suggested Citation

  • Kathryn Anderson & James Foster & David Frisvold, 2004. "Investing in Health: The Long-Term Impact of Head Start," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0426, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:van:wpaper:0426
    as

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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/VUECON/vu04-w26.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2004
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Currie, Janet & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Does Head Start Make a Difference?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 341-364, June.
    2. Alison Aughinbaugh, 2001. "Does Head Start Yield Long-Term Benefits?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(4), pages 641-665.
    3. John Bound, 1991. "Self-Reported Versus Objective Measures of Health in Retirement Models," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(1), pages 106-138.
    4. Kenkel, Donald S, 1991. "Health Behavior, Health Knowledge, and Schooling," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(2), pages 287-305, April.
    5. Gilleskie, Donna B. & Harrison, Amy L., 1998. "The effect of endogenous health inputs on the relationship between health and education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 279-295, June.
    6. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-255, March-Apr.
    7. Lee A. Lillard & Robert J. Willis, 1994. "Intergenerational Educational Mobility: Effects of Family and State in Malaysia," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(4), pages 1126-1166.
    8. Jere R. Behrman & Barbara L. Wolfe, 1989. "Does More Schooling Make Women Better Nourished and Healthier? Adult Sibling Random and Fixed Effects Estimates for Nicaragua," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(4), pages 644-663.
    9. Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2005. "The Relationship Between Education and Adult Mortality in the United States," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 72(1), pages 189-221.
    10. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1982:72:8:800-808_7 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Almond, Douglas & Currie, Janet, 2011. "Human Capital Development before Age Five," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
    2. Rebecca Cassells & Justine McNamara & Rachel Lloyd & Ann Harding, 2007. "Child Care Affordability and Availability," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 14(2), pages 123-139.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Early childhood education; Head Start; health; health capital; health disparities; human capital; program evaluation;

    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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