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Early child care and child outcomes: the role of grandparents

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Abstract

In this pap er, we fo cus on the impact of early grandparents' care on child cognitive out- comes, in the short and medium term, using data from the Millennium Cohort Study (UK). Compared with children lo oked after in a formal care centre, children cared by grandparents (as well as parents) are b etter in naming ob jects, but worse in tests concerning basic concepts development, problem-solving, mathematical concepts and constructing ability. In order to assess a causal link b etween early care and child outcomes, we employ panel metho ds and in- strumental variables techniques that conrm that grandparental care matters more for naming ability while formal care is more imp ortant for problem-solving ability and basic concepts de- velopment. These results hide strong heterogeneities: on the one hand, the p ositive asso ciation b etween grandparents' care and child outcomes is stronger for children in more advantaged households; on the other hand, the negative asso ciation is signicant only for children in more disadvantaged households

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  • Del Boca, Daniela & Piazzalunga, Daniela & Pronzato, Chiara, 2014. "Early child care and child outcomes: the role of grandparents," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201430, University of Turin.
  • Handle: RePEc:uto:dipeco:201430
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    1. James Heckman & Flavio Cunha, 2007. "The Technology of Skill Formation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 31-47, May.
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    12. Eva Garcia-Moran & Zoe Kuehn, 2012. "With Strings Attached: Grandparent-Provided Child care, Fertility, and Female Labor Market Outcomes," CEPRA working paper 1202, USI Università della Svizzera italiana.
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    1. repec:ces:ifodic:v:15:y:2017:i:1:p:19307500 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Daniela Del Boca, 2015. "Child Care Arrangements and Labor Supply," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 88074, Inter-American Development Bank.
    3. Daniela Del Boca & Enrica Maria Martino & Daniela Piazzalunga, 2017. "Investments in Early Education and Child Outcomes: The Short and the Long Run," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 15(1), pages 43-48, 04.
    4. Gloria Di Caprera, 2016. "Ready to learn: the role of childcare attendance on children's school outcomes in Italy," CEIS Research Paper 378, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 09 May 2016.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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