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Grandparenting and childbearing in the extended family


  • Arnstein Aassve, Elena Meroni, Chiara Pronzato
  • Elena Meroni
  • Chiara Pronzato


The paper analyses the impact of grandparenting on individualsí fertility behaviour using longitudinal data from eleven European countries. In particular, we focus on how siblings may share and compete for grandparentsí time in terms of childcare. By considering different family scenarios, we show that availability of grandparenting play an important role in individualsí decision making for having children. Grandparenting is particularly important in the South of Europe where public childcare is limited and here we see a large impact of grandparenting on fertility.

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  • Arnstein Aassve, Elena Meroni, Chiara Pronzato & Elena Meroni & Chiara Pronzato, 2011. "Grandparenting and childbearing in the extended family," Working Papers 038, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
  • Handle: RePEc:don:donwpa:038

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Evelyn Lehrer & Seiichi Kawasaki, 1985. "Child care arrangements and fertility: An analysis of two-earner households," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 22(4), pages 499-513, November.
    2. Wolff, Francois-Charles, 2006. "Microeconomic models of family transfers," Handbook on the Economics of Giving, Reciprocity and Altruism, Elsevier.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sara Cools & Rannveig Kaldager Hart, 2017. "The Effect of Childhood Family Size on Fertility in Adulthood: New Evidence From IV Estimation," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(1), pages 23-44, February.
    2. Soo-Yeon Yoon, 2017. "The influence of a supportive environment for families on women’s fertility intentions and behavior in South Korea," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(7), pages 227-254, January.
    3. Wolfgang Frimmel & Martin Halla & Bernhard Schmidpeter & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2017. "Grandmothers' Labor Supply," Economics working papers 2017-20, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    4. Tindara Addabbo & Marco Fuscaldo & Anna Maccagnan, 2014. "Care and the capability of living a healthy life in a gender perspective," Department of Economics 0042, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    5. Vincenzo Galasso & Paola Profeta & Chiara Pronzato & Francesco Billari, 2017. "Information and Women’s Intentions: Experimental Evidence About Child Care," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 33(1), pages 109-128, February.
    6. Albertini,Marco, 2016. "Ageing and family solidarity in Europe : patterns and driving factors of intergenerational support," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7678, The World Bank.
    7. Sara Cools & Rannveig Kaldager Hart, 2015. "The effect of childhood family size on fertility in adulthood. New evidence form IV estimation," Discussion Papers 802, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    8. Del Boca, Daniela & Piazzalunga, Daniela & Pronzato, Chiara D., 2014. "Early Child Care and Child Outcomes: The Role of Grandparents," IZA Discussion Papers 8565, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Tindara Addabbo & Marco Fuscaldo & Anna Maccagnan, 2012. "Care and the Capability of Living a Healthy Life in a Gender Perspective," Center for the Analysis of Public Policies (CAPP) 0099, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Dipartimento di Economia "Marco Biagi".
    10. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0620-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Edlira Narazani & Francesco Figari, 2017. "Female labour supply and childcare in Italy," JRC Working Papers on Taxation & Structural Reforms 2017-02, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    12. D. Vandelannoote & P. Vanleenhove & A. Decoster & J. Ghysels & G. Verbist, 2015. "Maternal employment: the impact of triple rationing in childcare," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 685-707, September.
    13. Francesco Figari & Edlira Narazani, 2015. "The joint decision of labour supply and childcare in Italy under costs and availability constraints," ImPRovE Working Papers 15/09, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    14. Antti Tanskanen & Anna Rotkirch, 2014. "The impact of grandparental investment on mothers’ fertility intentions in four European countries," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 31(1), pages 1-26, July.
    15. Pearl Dykstra & Aafke Komter, 2012. "Generational interdependencies in families," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(18), pages 487-506, October.

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    fertility; grandparents; SHARE; extended family;

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