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All in the Extended Family: Grandparents, Aunts, and Uncles and Educational Attainment

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  • Linda Loury

Abstract

Previous work on social interactions has analyzed the effects of nuclear family, peer, school, and neighborhood characteristics. This paper complements this research by first showing that individuals from similar nuclear families often differ in extended family member characteristics. It then demonstrates that older extended family members - aunts, uncles, and grandparents – independently affect college attendance probabilities and test score results of their younger relatives. In some cases, the sizes of the estimated effects are large enough to substantially narrow the achievement gap between disadvantaged and other youth.

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  • Linda Loury, 2006. "All in the Extended Family: Grandparents, Aunts, and Uncles and Educational Attainment," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0618, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  • Handle: RePEc:tuf:tuftec:0618
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    1. George A. Akerlof, 1997. "Social Distance and Social Decisions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(5), pages 1005-1028, September.
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    4. Heckman, James J, 1995. "Lessons from the Bell Curve," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(5), pages 1091-1120, October.
    5. Sandra E. Black & Amir Sufi, 2002. "Who Goes to College? Differential Enrollment by Race and Family Background," NBER Working Papers 9310, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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