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Would you train me with my mental illness? Evidence from a discrete choice experiment

  • Deuchert, Eva

    ()

  • Kauer, Lukas

    ()

  • Meisen Zannol, Flurina

    ()

The low employment among people with disabilities in general, and mental disorders in particular, generates high costs to the society. This raises the need to develop effective vocational rehabilitation methods. Supported Education/Employment is effective in increasing sustainable employment for people with mental disorders. This vocational rehabilitation method places patients directly in realistic work settings instead of training them in a protected work environment. Supported Education and Employment has not yet been widely implemented. Using a discrete choice experiment, we demonstrate that one of the key problems is to find employers willing to provide training. Non-cognitive dysfunctions are the main deterrents.

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File URL: http://www1.vwa.unisg.ch/RePEc/usg/econwp/EWP-1141.pdf
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Paper provided by University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science in its series Economics Working Paper Series with number 1141.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:usg:econwp:2011:41
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