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Biased Beliefs and Entry into Scientific Careers

Author

Listed:
  • Ina Ganguli

    (University of Massachusetts - Amherst)

  • Patrick Gaule

    (University of Bath)

  • Danijela Vuletic Cugalj

    (CERGE-EI)

Abstract

We investigate whether excessively optimistic beliefs play a role in the persistent demand for doctoral and postdoctoral training in science. We elicit the beliefs and career preferences of doctoral students through a novel survey and randomize the provision of structured information on the true state of the academic market and information through role models on nonacademic careers. One year later, both treatments lead students to update their beliefs about the academic market and impact career preferences. However, we do not find an effect on actual career outcomes two years postintervention.

Suggested Citation

  • Ina Ganguli & Patrick Gaule & Danijela Vuletic Cugalj, 2020. "Biased Beliefs and Entry into Scientific Careers," Upjohn Working Papers 20-334, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:20-334
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    higher education; information; biased beliefs; career preferences; science;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General
    • D84 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Expectations; Speculations
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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