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Short- and Long-Run Tradeoff Monetary Easing

Author

Listed:
  • Koki Oikawa

    (Waseda University)

  • Kozo Ueda

    (School of Political Science and Economics, Waseda University and Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis (CAMA))

Abstract

In this study, we illustrate a tradeoff between the short-run positive and long-run negative effects of monetary easing by using a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model embedding endogenous growth with creative destruction and sticky prices due to menu costs. While a monetary easing shock increases the level of consumption because of price stickiness, it lowers the frequency of creative destruction (i.e., product substitution) because inflation reduces the reward for innovation via menu cost payments. The model calibrated to the U.S. economy suggests that the adverse effect dominates in the long run.

Suggested Citation

  • Koki Oikawa & Kozo Ueda, 2015. "Short- and Long-Run Tradeoff Monetary Easing," UTokyo Price Project Working Paper Series 058, University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:upd:utppwp:058
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mark Bils, 2009. "Do Higher Prices for New Goods Reflect Quality Growth or Inflation?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(2), pages 637-675.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Pfeiffer, 2017. "How much Keynes and how much Schumpeter? An Estimated Macromodel of the US Economy," 2017 Meeting Papers 324, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Cozzi, Guido & Pataracchia, Beatrice & Pfeiffer, Philipp & Marco, Ratto, 2017. "How much Keynes and how much Schumpeter? An Estimated Macromodel of the US Economy," Working Papers 2017-01, Joint Research Centre, European Commission (Ispra site).
    3. repec:eee:moneco:v:94:y:2018:i:c:p:79-93 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Arawatari, Ryo & Hori, Takeo & Mino, Kazuo, 2018. "On the nonlinear relationship between inflation and growth: A theoretical exposition," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 79-93.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Schumpeterian; new Keynesian; non-neutrality of money;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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