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An Empirical Analysis of the Thai and Major International Stock Markets

This paper investigates the existence of cointegration and causality between the stock market price indices of Thailand and its major trading partners (Australia, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, the UK and the US), using monthly data spanning December 1987 to December 2005. Both the Engle- Granger two-step procedure (assuming no structural breaks) and the Gregory and Hansen (1996) test (allowing for one structural break) provide no evidence of a long-run relationship between the stock prices of Thailand and these countries. Based on the empirical results obtained from these two residual-based cointegration tests, potential long-run benefits exist from diversifying the investment portfolios internationally to reduce the associated systematic risks across countries. However, in the short run, three unidirectional Granger causalities run from the stock returns of Hong Kong, the Philippines and the UK to those of Thailand, pair-wise. Furthermore, there are two unidirectional causalities running from the stock returns of Thailand to those of Indonesia and the US. We also found empirical evidence of bidirectional Granger causality, suggesting that the stock returns of Thailand and three of its neighbouring countries (Malaysia, Singapore and Taiwan) are interrelated. No previous study examines the possibility that the pair-wise long-run relationship between the stock prices of Thailand and those of both emerging and developed markets may have been subject to a structural break.

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File URL: http://www.uow.edu.au/content/groups/public/@web/@commerce/@econ/documents/doc/uow038556.pdf
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Paper provided by School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia in its series Economics Working Papers with number wp07-13.

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Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uow:depec1:wp07-13
Contact details of provider: Postal: School of Economics, University of Wollongong, Northfields Avenue, Wollongong NSW 2522 Australia
Phone: +612 4221-3659
Fax: +612 4221-3725
Web page: http://business.uow.edu.au/econ/index.html

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  1. Tsangyao Chang, 2001. "Are there any long-run benefits from international equity diversification for Taiwan investors diversifying in the equity markets of its major trading partners, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea, Thailand," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(7), pages 441-446.
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  3. Kasa, Kenneth, 1992. "Common stochastic trends in international stock markets," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 95-124, February.
  4. Gregory, Allan W. & Hansen, Bruce E., 1996. "Residual-based tests for cointegration in models with regime shifts," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 99-126, January.
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  8. Susmel, Raul & Engle, Robert F., 1994. "Hourly volatility spillovers between international equity markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 3-25, February.
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  11. Jian Yang & James Kolari & Insik Min, 2003. "Stock market integration and financial crises: the case of Asia," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(7), pages 477-486.
  12. Fratzscher, M., 2001. "Financial Market Integration in Europe: On the Effects of EMU on Stock Markets," Papers 48, Quebec a Montreal - Recherche en gestion.
  13. Angelos Kanas, . "Linkages between the US and European Equity Markets: Further Evidence from cointegration Tests," Working Papers 9804, University of Crete, Department of Economics.
  14. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-38, July.
  15. Perron, P, 1988. "The Great Crash, The Oil Price Shock And The Unit Root Hypothesis," Papers 338, Princeton, Department of Economics - Econometric Research Program.
  16. Kausik Chaudhuri, 1997. "Cointegration, error correction and Granger causality: an application with Latin American stock markets," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(8), pages 469-471.
  17. Mansor H. Ibrahim & Hassanuddeen Aziz, 2003. "Macroeconomic variables and the Malaysian equity market: A view through rolling subsamples," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(1), pages 6-27, January.
  18. Andrew C. Worthington & Masaki Katsuura & Helen Higgs, 2003. "Price Linkages in Asian Equity Markets: Evidence Bordering the Asian Economic, Currency and Financial Crises," Asia-Pacific Financial Markets, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 29-44.
  19. Anthony J. Richards, 1996. "Comovements in National Stock Market Returns; Evidence of Predictability But Not Cointegration," IMF Working Papers 96/28, International Monetary Fund.
  20. Phylaktis, Kate & Ravazzolo, Fabiola, 2005. "Stock market linkages in emerging markets: implications for international portfolio diversification," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 91-106, April.
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  22. Chaudhuri, Kausik & Wu, Yangru, 2003. "Random walk versus breaking trend in stock prices: Evidence from emerging markets," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 575-592, April.
  23. Engle, Robert F & Granger, Clive W J, 1987. "Co-integration and Error Correction: Representation, Estimation, and Testing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 251-76, March.
  24. Shigeyuki Hamori & Yuriko Imamura, 2000. "International transmission of stock prices among G7 countries: LA-VAR approach," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(9), pages 613-618.
  25. Robert J. Barro, 2001. "Economic Growth in East Asia Before and After the Financial Crisis," NBER Working Papers 8330, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  26. Angelos Kanas, 1998. "Volatility spillovers across equity markets: European evidence," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(3), pages 245-256.
  27. Lawrence H. Summers, 2000. "International Financial Crises: Causes, Prevention, and Cures," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 1-16, May.
  28. Masih, Abul M. M. & Masih, Rumi, 1999. "Are Asian stock market fluctuations due mainly to intra-regional contagion effects? Evidence based on Asian emerging stock markets," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 7(3-4), pages 251-282, August.
  29. Kam C. Chan & Benton E. Gup & Ming-Shiun Pan, 1997. "International Stock Market Efficiency and Integration: A Study of Eighteen Nations," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(6), pages 803-813.
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