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The determinanths of industrialisation in developing countries, 1960-2005

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  • Guadagno, Francesca

    () (UNU‐MERIT, Maastricht University, and UNCTAD)

Abstract

Industrialisation is generally considered a synonym of economic development. This paper contributes to the literature on the engine of growth hypothesis with an empirical analysis of the determinants of industrialisation. The paper goes back to the Cornwall (1977) model of manufacturing as an engine of growth and estimates the first equation of the model, i.e. the equation of manufacturing output growth. Hausman and Taylor models are estimated for a sample of 74 countries for the period 1960-2005. The results indicate that industrialisation is faster for larger countries with an undeveloped industrial base, strong export performance, and undervalued exchange rates. Skills and knowledge accumulation played an increasingly important role since the mid-1990s. Robustness checks corroborate the validity of these findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Guadagno, Francesca, 2016. "The determinanths of industrialisation in developing countries, 1960-2005," MERIT Working Papers 031, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2016031
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    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/wppdf/2016/wp2016-031.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mawussé K. N. Okey, 2017. "Does migration promote industrial development in Africa?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(1), pages 228-247.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    industrialisation; manufacturing sector; technological change; industrial policy;

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy

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