IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/umb/econwp/10124.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Origination Channel, Prepayment Penalties, and Default

Author

Listed:
  • Morgan J. Rose

    () (UMBC)

Abstract

This paper presents evidence that non-bank-originated subprime mortgages have a higher probability of default than bank-originated subprime mortgages, but only for loans with prepayment penalties. Evidence also indicates that non-banks price prepayment penalties less favorably to borrowers than banks do, and non-banks originate disproportionately more loans with prepayment penalties in locales with less financially sophisticated borrowers. State anti-predatory lending law provisions restricting the use of prepayment penalties eliminate the elevated default risk of non-bank originations relative to bank originations. These findings are consistent with incentives generated by non-bank compensation via yield spread premiums on loans with prepayment penalties.

Suggested Citation

  • Morgan J. Rose, 2010. "Origination Channel, Prepayment Penalties, and Default," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 10-124, UMBC Department of Economics, revised 01 Jul 2011.
  • Handle: RePEc:umb:econwp:10124
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.umbc.edu/economics/wpapers/wp_10_124.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Anthony Pennington‐Cross & Giang Ho, 2010. "The Termination of Subprime Hybrid and Fixed‐Rate Mortgages," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 38(3), pages 399-426, September.
    2. Anthony Pennington‐Cross & Giang Ho, 2008. "Predatory Lending Laws and the Cost of Credit," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 36(2), pages 175-211, June.
    3. Ho, Giang & Pennington-Cross, Anthony, 2006. "The impact of local predatory lending laws on the flow of subprime credit," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 210-228, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Beltratti, Andrea & Benetton, Matteo & Gavazza, Alessandro, 2017. "The role of prepayment penalties in mortgage loans," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 165-179.
    2. O. Emre Ergungor & Stephanie Moulton, 2014. "Beyond the Transaction: Banks and Mortgage Default of Low‐Income Homebuyers," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(8), pages 1721-1752, December.
    3. Egle Jakucionyte & Swapnil Singh, 2019. "Mortgage Foreclosure Risk After the Great Recession," Bank of Lithuania Working Paper Series 69, Bank of Lithuania.
    4. Morgan J. Rose, 2011. "Prepayment Penalties: Efficieny and Predation," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 11-133, UMBC Department of Economics.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Raphael Bostic & Souphala Chomsisengphet & Kathleen Engel & Patricia McCoy & Anthony Pennington-Cross & Susan Wachter, 2012. "Mortgage Product Substitution and State Anti-predatory Lending Laws: Better Loans and Better Borrowers?," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 40(3), pages 273-294, September.
    2. Steinbuks, Jevgenijs, 2015. "Effects of prepayment regulations on termination of subprime mortgages," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 445-456.
    3. Kusum Mundra, 2013. "Minority and Immigrant Homeownership Experience: Evidence from the 2009 American Housing Survey," Working Papers Rutgers University, Newark 2013-001, Department of Economics, Rutgers University, Newark.
    4. Goodman, Allen C. & Smith, Brent C., 2010. "Residential mortgage default: Theory works and so does policy," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 280-294, December.
    5. W. Scott Frame & Lawrence J. White, 2009. "Technological change, financial innovation, and diffusion in banking," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2009-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    6. Bostic, Raphael W. & Engel, Kathleen C. & McCoy, Patricia A. & Pennington-Cross, Anthony & Wachter, Susan M., 2008. "State and local anti-predatory lending laws: The effect of legal enforcement mechanisms," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 60(1-2), pages 47-66.
    7. Xu, Yilan, 2014. "Does mortgage deregulation increase foreclosures? Evidence from Cleveland," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 126-139.
    8. Qianqian Cao & Shimeng Liu, 2015. "The Impact of State Foreclosure and Bankruptcy Laws on Higher-Risk Lending: Evidence from FHA and Subprime Mortgage Originations," Working Paper 9411, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    9. Kusum Mundra, 2020. "Immigrant and Minority Homeownership Experience: Evidence from the 2009 American Housing Survey," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 46(1), pages 53-81, January.
    10. Gerardi Kristopher & Willen Paul, 2009. "Subprime Mortgages, Foreclosures, and Urban Neighborhoods," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(3), pages 1-37, March.
    11. Anthony Pennington‐Cross & Giang Ho, 2008. "Predatory Lending Laws and the Cost of Credit," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 36(2), pages 175-211, June.
    12. Reamonn Lyndon & Yvonne McCarthy, 2013. "What Lies Beneath? Understanding Recent Trends in Irish Mortgage Arrears," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 44(1), pages 117-150.
    13. Chan, Sewin & Gedal, Michael & Been, Vicki & Haughwout, Andrew, 2013. "The role of neighborhood characteristics in mortgage default risk: Evidence from New York City," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 100-118.
    14. Kathe Newman, 2010. "Go Public!," Journal of the American Planning Association, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 76(2), pages 160-171, April.
    15. Michael LaCour‐Little & Cynthia Holmes, 2008. "Prepayment penalties in residential mortgage contracts: A cost‐benefit analysis," Housing Policy Debate, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(4), pages 631-673, January.
    16. Jevgenijs Steinbuks & Gregory Elliehausen, 2014. "The Economic Effects of Legal Restrictions on High-Cost Mortgages," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 49(1), pages 47-72, July.
    17. Patrick Bajari & Chenghuan Sean Chu & Minjung Park, 2008. "An Empirical Model of Subprime Mortgage Default From 2000 to 2007," NBER Working Papers 14625, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Marsha J. Courchane & Leonard C. Kiefer & Peter M. Zorn, 2015. "A Tale of Two Tensions: Balancing Access to Credit and Credit Risk in Mortgage Underwriting," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 43(4), pages 993-1034, November.
    19. Epouhe, Onesime & Hall, Arden, 2016. "Payment shock in HELOCs at the end of the draw period," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 131-147.
    20. deRitis, Cristian & Kuo, Chionglong & Liang, Yongping, 2010. "Payment shock and mortgage performance," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 295-314, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    foreclosure; prepayment penalties; mortgage brokers; financial regulation; anti-predatory lending laws.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • D18 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Protection
    • L85 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Real Estate Services

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:umb:econwp:10124. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christelle Viauroux). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/edumbus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.