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El estado de salud de los uruguayos

Author

Listed:
  • Ianina Rossi

    (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

  • Fernanda Tellechea

    (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

  • Fiorella Tramontin
  • Patricia Triunfo

    (Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad de la República)

Abstract

Research has established that health status is affected not only by medical factors but also by socioeconomic variables. In this paper we analyze the links between health status (measured by self-reported illness occurrence in the last 12 months) and individuals’ socioeconomic situation. Using the annual households surveys of Uruguay for the period 1991 to 2000, we compute probit models and find that men, unmarried, those who do not live alone, young people, those who have a job and those with more than 5 years of education, have a smaller probability of reporting a bad health status. Also, we evaluate the evolution of self-reported health status during this 10-years period and find that the probability of reporting a bad health status has a descendent trend, being 0,34 in 1991 and 0,25 in 2000.

Suggested Citation

  • Ianina Rossi & Fernanda Tellechea & Fiorella Tramontin & Patricia Triunfo, 2006. "El estado de salud de los uruguayos," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 2106, Department of Economics - dECON.
  • Handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:2106
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Máximo Rossi & Patricia Triunfo, 2004. "El Estado de Salud del Adulto Mayor en Uruguay," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 1404, Department of Economics - dECON.
    2. Gardner, Jonathan & Oswald, Andrew, 2004. "How is mortality affected by money, marriage, and stress?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1181-1207, November.
    3. Angus Deaton, 2003. "Health, Inequality, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 113-158.
    4. Michael Grossman, 1972. "The Demand for Health: A Theoretical and Empirical Investigation," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number gros72-1.
    5. R. Todd Jewell & Máximo Rossi & Patricia Triunfo, 2007. "El Estado De Salud Del Adulto Mayor En América Latina," REVISTA CUADERNOS DE ECONOMÍA, UN - RCE - CID.
    6. Michael Baker & Mark Stabile & Catherine Deri, 2004. "What Do Self-Reported, Objective, Measures of Health Measure?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press.
    7. Robert W. Fogel, 2004. "Changes in the Disparities in Chronic Disease during the Course of the Twentieth Century," NBER Working Papers 10311, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. John Bound, 1991. "Self-Reported Versus Objective Measures of Health in Retirement Models," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(1), pages 106-138.
    9. Robert W. Fogel & Chulhee Lee, 2003. "Who Gets Health Care?," NBER Working Papers 9870, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", pages 129-137.
    11. Wilson, Chris M & Oswald, Andrew J, 2005. "How Does Marriage Affect Physical and Psychological Health? A Survey of the Longitudinal Evidence," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 728, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    12. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2001. "Economic Expansions Are Unhealthy: Evidence from Microdata," NBER Working Papers 8447, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Hugo Benítez-Silva & Moshe Buchinsky & Hiu Man Chan & Sofia Cheidvasser & John Rust, 2004. "How large is the bias in self-reported disability?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., pages 649-670.
    14. Gerdtham, Ulf-G. & Johannesson, Magnus, 1999. "New estimates of the demand for health: results based on a categorical health measure and Swedish micro data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 1325-1332.
    15. R. Todd Jewell & Máximo Rossi & Patricia Triunfo, 2007. "El Estado De Salud Del Adulto Mayor En América Latina," REVISTA CUADERNOS DE ECONOMÍA, UN - RCE - CID.
    16. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-255, March-Apr.
    17. Grossman, Michael, 2000. "The human capital model," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 7, pages 347-408 Elsevier.
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    20. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1982:72:8:800-808_7 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. R Todd Jewell & Maximo Rossi & Patricia Triunfo, 2006. "El Estado de Salud de los Jóvenes Uruguayos," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 43(128), pages 235-250.
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    Cited by:

    1. Máximo Rossi & Patricia Triunfo, 2004. "Gastar en Cuidados Médicos: ¿Es un Lujo para los Montevideanos?," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0604, Department of Economics - dECON.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    health capital; health status; human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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