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Can Competition Extend the Golden Age of Antibiotics?

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  • Eswaran, Mukesh
  • Gallini, Nancy

Abstract

Countries world wide face an imminent global health crisis. As resistant bacteria render the current stock of antibiotics ine¤ective and the pipeline of back-up drugs runs dry, pharmaceutical companies are abandoning their research in antibiotics. In this paper we ask: Why are pharmaceutical companies closing antibiotic research labs when the stakes are so high? Implementing a simple dynamic framework, we show that the environment for new antibiotics is relatively hostile, compared to other medicines, due to market failures that result in excessive use and acceleration of natural selection. The analysis reveals, however, that increased competition between drugs can actually slow down the rate of resistance without, in some cases, diluting research incentives. This result, which is bolstered by scientific evidence, arises from a fundamental interplay between economic and biological externalities. We propose a patent-antitrust regime for aligning drug research and usage with those of the social planner, which implies an alternative justification of the patent system.

Suggested Citation

  • Eswaran, Mukesh & Gallini, Nancy, 2018. "Can Competition Extend the Golden Age of Antibiotics?," Microeconomics.ca working papers tina_marandola-2018-1, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 29 Jan 2018.
  • Handle: RePEc:ubc:pmicro:tina_marandola-2018-1
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    File URL: https://econ2017.sites.olt.ubc.ca/files/2018/01/pdf_paper_eswaran_gallini-golden-age-antibiotics-2018.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    antibiotic resistence; market competition; R&D incentives; patents;

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I13 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Insurance, Public and Private
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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