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College Schooling for Grandchildren and Contact with Grandparents

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  • Linda Datcher Loury

Abstract

Previous work on social interactions analyzed the effects of nuclear family, peer, school, and neighborhood characteristics. This is the first paper showing that, independent of unobserved parent's characteristics, higher years of grandparents' schooling increase college attendance rates for grandchildren. The paper implies that background effects are more pervasive and longer-lasting than previously believed. It also suggests that some policies aimed at reducing inequality may be less effective than initially hypothesized.

Suggested Citation

  • Linda Datcher Loury, 2010. "College Schooling for Grandchildren and Contact with Grandparents," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0757, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  • Handle: RePEc:tuf:tuftec:0757
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    File URL: http://ase.tufts.edu/econ/research/documents/2010/collegeSchooling.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Black, Sandra E. & Devereux, Paul J., 2011. "Recent Developments in Intergenerational Mobility," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 16, pages 1487-1541, Elsevier.
    2. Maurin, Eric, 2002. "The impact of parental income on early schooling transitions: A re-examination using data over three generations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(3), pages 301-332, September.
    3. Susan M. Dynarski, 2003. "Does Aid Matter? Measuring the Effect of Student Aid on College Attendance and Completion," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 279-288, March.
    4. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
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