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Digital Urban Network Connectivity: Global and Chinese Internet Patterns

Author

Listed:
  • Emmanouil Tranos

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Karima Kourtit

    (VU University Amsterdam)

  • Peter Nijkamp

    (VU University Amsterdam)

Abstract

This discussion paper led to an article in Papers in Regional Science (2014). Volume 93, Issue 2(SI). The majority of cities in our world is not only connected through conventional physical infrastructure, but increasingly through modern digital infrastructure. This paper aims to test whether digital connectivity leads to other linkage patterns among world cities than traditional infrastructure. Using a generalized spatial interaction model, this paper shows that geography (and distance) still matters for an extensive set of world cities analysed in the present study. With a view to the rapidly rising urbanization in many regions of our world, the attention is next focused on the emerging large cities in China in order to test the relevance of distance frictions - next to a broad set of other important explanatory variables - for digital connectivity in this country. Various interesting results are found regarding digital connectivity within the Chinese urban system, while also here geography appears to play an important role.

Suggested Citation

  • Emmanouil Tranos & Karima Kourtit & Peter Nijkamp, 2012. "Digital Urban Network Connectivity: Global and Chinese Internet Patterns," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 12-124/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20120124
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Evert Meijers & Martijn Burger & Michiel Meeteren & Zachary Neal & Ben Derudder, 2016. "Disentangling agglomeration and network externalities: A conceptual typology," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(1), pages 61-80, March.
    2. Kourtit, Karima & Nijkamp, Peter & Steenbruggen, John, 2017. "The significance of digital data systems for smart city policy," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 13-21.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Digital Networks; Internet; Connectivity; World Cities; Death of Distance; Centrality; Small-World Networks; Clustering; Gravity Model;

    JEL classification:

    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • H54 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Infrastructures
    • P25 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Urban, Rural, and Regional Economics

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