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Trust and reciprocity: Extensions and robustness of triadic design

Listed author(s):
  • Di Bartolomeo Giovanni
  • Papa Stefano

Our paper reconsiders the triadic design proposed by Cox (Games and Economic Behavior 46:260–281, 2004 ) to identify trust and reciprocity in investment games. Specifically, we extend the design in two directions. First, we collect information on investors’ choices by using both the direct-response (as does Cox) and strategy methods. Using the latter, we are able to condition reciprocity on initial inequality, which is endogenous when investigating reciprocity. We demonstrate that the triadic design provides evidence for reciprocity once that initial inequality is considered. Second, we elicit expectations and test their coherence with the triadic outcomes. By examining the relationship between trust actions and expected gains, we analyze whether investors’ expectations are consistent with their behavior. Finally, we test for the existence of an emotional bias, i.e., whether expectation mismatches induce trustees to change actual choices from the planned ones. Copyright Economic Science Association 2016

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Paper provided by Department of Communication, University of Teramo in its series wp.comunite with number 0111.

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Date of creation: Sep 2014
Handle: RePEc:ter:wpaper:0111
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://wp.comunite.it/

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